Tagged: 苏州君临国际会所是干什么的

02
Mar
2021

Formula 5 Announces Extensive Spring Tour Dates

first_imgFormula 5, Upstate New York’s funk jam band, has announced a riveting tour across the Northeast for the Spring. The four-piece from Albany will be stopping in Vermont, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, and Connecticut throughout the run, performing alongside some talented musicians throughout.Between a five-night residency at Nectar’s to shows with Teddy Midnight, Gubbilidis, The Jauntee, Strange Machines and more, this is one tour you won’t want to miss. This band can seriously play! Check them out covering Phish’s “Sand” with Goose’s Rick Mitaronida on guitar from last week, February 20th, at B.R.Y.A.C in Bridgeport, CT.The full tour schedule can be found below, with tickets and more information available here.Formula 5 Spring Tour DatesMarch 2 – Nectar’s, Burlington, VT ^March 9 – Nectar’s, Burlington, VT !March 16 – Nectar’s, Burlington, VTMarch 19 – Madfest, SUNY PotsdamMarch 23 – Nectar’s, Burlington, VT &March 25 – Rock n Roll Resort, Kerhonksen, NYMarch 26 – Putnam Den, Saratoga Springs, NY #$March 30 – Nectar’s, Burlington, VTApril 1 – Funk n Waffles, Syracuse, NY #April 6 – Mexicali Blues, Teaneck, NJ #April 16 – Stella Blues, New Haven, CT %April 20 – The Hollow, Albany, NY @April 23 – The Monopole, Plattsburgh, NYApril 29 – King Neptune’s, Lake George, NY %May 5 –B.R.Y.A.C., Bridgeport, CTMay 6 – Stone Church, New Market, NH +^ with The Jauntee* with Zach Rhoads Trio! with The Original Q& with Gubbilidis# with Teddy Midnight$ with Loveport% with G[email protected] with Dr. Jah and the Love Prophets+ with Strange Machineslast_img read more

01
Mar
2021

Does food have a gender?

first_img Melting pot of American cuisine Throughout time and in many cultures, food, whether in the home or professional domain, has long been associated with gender and a range of social and political realities. Culinary historian Barbara Haber and celebrated chef Lydia Shire explored some of those connections during a recent talk titled “Does Food Have a Gender?,” sponsored by Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and moderated by food journalist Louisa Kasdon.Pages filled with recipes offer a window into social and cultural change for Haber, who curated a robust collection of cookbooks at the Radcliffe Institute’s Schlesinger Library. She said such texts reveal “social norms at any given time and place.” Those norms placed American women in their home kitchens throughout the 19th and much of the 20th century. A 1901 cookbook refers to the man of the house who “cheerfully sallies forth to labor for those he loves,” with a perfectly packed lunch, she said, and warns women against “carelessly slighting your loved one” by ignoring his carry-out meal. “It was making it clear,” said Haber, that women should be saving their households from behind their sinks and stoves.Still, some women railed against such stereotypes. In her 1878 cookbook “My Summer in the Kitchen,” Hetty Morrison describes the “diabolically expansive qualities of rice” and criticizes “writers of cookbooks who set up false expectations,” said Haber. But Morrison was largely the exception. Even writers Erma Bombeck and Peg Bracken, 20th-century humorists known for their wry takes on home life, “sort of accepted the cards they were played,” said Haber, “and it wasn’t until Betty Friedan came along with the ‘Feminine Mystique’ in 1963 when the whistle was finally blown.”While many cookbooks in that period were written by women, men penned them too. Often, though, male authors sought to disparage women, “by proving that their interest in food was loftier, a higher art, while women were mere drudges,” said Haber. She added that although “stereotyping may be over when it comes to cookbooks,” gender equality in society at large is still far from a daily reality.,Interestingly, it was a man who inspired Boston chef and restaurateur Shire’s lifelong love affair with food. When not working as an artist, Shire’s father, a quiet Irishman with an understated “elegance,” enlisted his daughter’s help in the kitchen. Shire eventually trained at the Cordon Bleu and became the first female head chef at Boston’s famed Locke-Ober restaurant, a favored haunt of Boston businessmen which opened in 1875 and didn’t even admit women until 1970. Shire still remembers the smell of the first garlic clove she chopped with a giant cleaver at the age of 4, and the sight of her father searing a flank steak to perfection on an old, cast-iron pancake griddle.“It was love at first sight,” said Shire. “I wanted to be like my father.”While professional kitchens were predominantly run by men early in Shire’s career, today the culinary landscape looks very different, with many more women working as chefs. Related Peabody Museum examines the origins of our favorite foods, how we make them, and who serves them “That’s changed dramatically. That’s a big change. … My God, women are amazing,” said Shire, acknowledging that while “women always have to work harder than their male counterparts do,” there is “definitely more respect in a kitchen now.”In the end, Shire said, the proof of a chef’s talent, regardless of gender, is the quality of the food.“If you are a smart cook and you’re coaxing flavor out of something and you’re not afraid to season something, you’re not afraid to be bold and brassy, and maybe keep adding something until you taste something and you say, ‘Ah, that’s it. Stop. No more’ — I feel, to me that’s what a professional is,” said Shire. “And I think, a man professional and a woman professional, to me they’re the same.”No talk on food and gender would have been complete without a mention of Julia Child, the culinary great and Cambridge resident who revolutionized American cooking by simply sharing her love of French food with others. Shire recalled nights at Child’s home filled with wine and hors d’oeuvres. The food was important, but so were the connections. “She was not an egomaniac who wanted adulation,” said Shire. “She just really wanted person A to meet person B and make something happen.”How will the food landscape change after COVID-19? Kasdon wondered. Once there is a working vaccine, Shire and Haber said they envision those who are tired of cooking at home, along with any number of up-and-coming chefs, recharging the restaurant scene. “I’m hoping rents will be attainable for young people and that you will get a whole new generation, a whole new wave of restaurants, food shops of all sorts, both started by women and men,” said Haber.Shire agreed. “I think that as far as young chefs working their way up, it’ll be equal, equal men, equal women.”The discussion was inspired by the Peabody exhibition “Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing Tastes.”last_img read more

17
Sep
2020

Bailey: Ennis brings crunch-time composure, team value unparalleled by Parker, other freshmen

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Much debate has been made of this year’s class of talented freshmen. Syracuse’s Tyler Ennis and Duke’s Jabari Parker are two of them – arguably the two best – and Daily Orange beat writers Stephen Bailey and David Wilson make their respective arguments for the two rookies. See David’s case for Parker here.The strong contingent of Syracuse fans in Joel Coliseum let out a collective gasp late in the second half Wednesday night. Tyler Ennis had turned his ankle.Not the cold-blooded, courageous freshman. Not the horse SU has rode through all but 31 minutes of its 13 games against power-conference teams. Not the Orange’s golden ticket back to the Final Four.Ennis stood with his hands on his knees, teammates circling around him at the free-throw line. Jim Boeheim asked the referee to check on him.Did he need to come out?AdvertisementThis is placeholder textEnnis lifted his head toward the official, held up his right hand and shook his head. No.But for one brief moment, the same thought crept through everyone’s head — what would Syracuse do without him?“It’s hard to say,” SU forward Jerami Grant said. “It’s something that we really haven’t been able to think about because he’s been there the whole season.”Said C.J. Fair: “He’s the most important piece of the team.”Ennis turned in his third straight heroic performance with 16 second-half points against Wake Forest. He gave No. 2 Syracuse (20-0, 7-0 Atlantic Coast) a chance for its best start in program history when it hosts No. 17 Duke (17-4, 6-2) and fellow stud rookie Jabari Parker on Saturday at 6:30 p.m.Parker is touted by many as the ACC’s best player, but flash and flair and scoring ability will only get you so far in the college game. Great players have the ability to raise their individual performance, but the best players have the ability to raise their team’s performance.In the last five minutes of games this season, Ennis hasn’t committed a single turnover and is shooting nearly 50 percent.“Tyler Ennis is having as good a year as any freshman,” Boeheim said after the St. John’s game on Dec. 15.That was back when Ennis was still getting going. He’s since proven more than a court general. He’s the team’s best crunch-time option.Against Pittsburgh on Jan. 18, he tallied the go-ahead bucket, another layup and two free throws in the final 1:48 as part of a 14-point second half. Against Miami last Saturday, he scored a crucial three-point play and the go-ahead jumper. And against Wake Forest on Wednesday, he had two more field goals in the second half alone than any of his teammates had all game.Parker, who shoots 46.5 percent, hasn’t made more than half of his shots in a game since Dec. 19. His rebounding numbers have been staggering, but Ennis counters with the most steals per game in the conference.“He’s smarter than I am,” Boeheim joked.Even during the other 35 minutes of each game where Ennis hasn’t been superhuman, he’s been Syracuse‘s only capable ball handler.Without him, SU would have at least a few conference losses.Junior Duke transfer Michael Gbinije’s attempted transformation from small forward to point guard has been a failure, and Trevor Cooney isn’t much better against pressure. The point guard depth is so bad that even freshman Ron Patterson could be considered the next-best option.“Without Tyler this team would be totally different,” Fair said. “I think coming into Syracuse, he knew what the challenge was going to be and he did a good job prospering in the system.”In the locker room after the Wake Forest game, Grant cut me off before I could even finish the question.Which freshman is more val—“Our freshman is more valuable than theirs,” he said.Why?“Because he’s better.”Ennis said he doesn’t like to compare himself to other players on an individual level, especially when they play different positions. But he brought the conversation back to a player’s ability to help his team win.This Saturday, Ennis said, the final score will prove who wins the individual matchup between him and Parker.Said Ennis: “So as far as matchups, I think whoever wins the game is going to be the one who wins the matchup.”Stephen Bailey is the sports editor at The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. You can contact him at [email protected] and follow him on Twitter @Stephen_Bailey1. Comments Published on January 31, 2014 at 4:48 amlast_img read more

09
Sep
2020

Third round of Senior Football games get underway this evening

first_imgThe action turns to senior club football this weekend with the third round of games getting underway this evening.In Leahy Park Mid Tipp’s Drom Inch take on Kilsheelan-Kilcash from the south, and in Clonmel it’s a local derby as Moyle Rovers and Fethard clash.County champions Loughmore Castleiney are also down to play Ardfinnan this evening in Golden. All games get underway at 8pm.last_img