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20
Sep
2020

Swan bidding farewell

first_imgCharlie Swan will be hoping Drumlee can help him bid a victorious farewell to the National Hunt scene in the Irish Stallion Farms European Breeders Breeders Fund Rated Novice Chase at Thurles. Press Association Swan is set to relinquish his training licence at the end of the week and while he has a couple of entries on the level at Dundalk on Friday, Drumlee will be his final runner over obstacles in this two-mile event. The seven-year-old has got his head in front since last March but his second place last time out combined with a joint-top rating of 116 means there is every chance he can strike gold for his retiring handler. center_img Elsie, the other runner rated at 116, is an obvious threat along with the likes of wide-margin Tramore winner Davinia’s Tip and Limerick third Benrouge. Shamiran heads the field for the feature race of the day, the Thurles Handicap Hurdle, as he drops back to the smaller obstacles after a couple of unsuccessful chase outings. Really Unique and Shuilamach will surely be popular selections, with the latter having claimed victory at Cork earlier in the month. Our Katie chased home the classy Vroum Vroum Mag in a Grade Three on her latest outing and is a likely favourite in the Irish Stallion Farms European Breeders Fund Mares Beginners Chase. The Willie Mullins-trained Totally Dominant heads the runners in the thurles.ie Maiden Hurdle with the dual bumper winner on something of a retrieval mission after finishing only fourth on his hurdles bow. Mullins saddles Listen Dear in the closing Fethard INH Flat Race with the mare having placed second on her only point to point outing to date. Spacious Sky in the Follow Us On Facebook Handicap Hurdle and Jim Dreaper’s mulitple point to point winner Venitien De Mai in the I.N.H. Stallion Owners European Breeders Fund Maiden Hurdle are others to note on a busy afternoon of action. last_img read more

17
Sep
2020

TENNIS : Seniors Harman, Parra prepare for last home match of season

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ The feeling is starting to sink in for Alessondra Parra and Emily Harman. By the end of this weekend, they will have played their last home matches in a Syracuse uniform.For Parra, this weekend’s matches are a cold reminder that her time at SU is almost up.‘I feel like my time at Syracuse has gone really quickly, and this is kind of a realization that it’s going to be over soon,’ Parra said.After travel budget restrictions forced Army to cancel next Sunday’s match at Drumlins Tennis Center, this weekend’s home matches against Binghamton and Boston University will be the last for the senior duo. The last homestand is special for Harman and Parra as well as their young teammates. With an NCAA bid on the line in every remaining match, though, No. 47 SU (10-4, 5-1 Big East) has little time to reflect.‘I got to spend time with Emily and Alessondra for two years now, so it’s going to be a very sensitive moment,’ sophomore Aleah Morrow said. ‘But, you know, we’re gonna go out there, be ready to compete, be ready to get the win.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter a deflating 5-2 loss to then-No. 59 William & Mary on Feb. 24, head coach Luke Jensen decided to play Harman and Parra together at No. 1 doubles. The pair knocked off ranked doubles team Hanna Yu and Vicky Brook of then-No. 25 Yale to help the Orange register a historic victory.The senior doubles tandem and the SU team haven’t lost since.Having Harman and Parra at the top doubles spot strengthens the entire team. Jensen considers the veteran duo the ‘compass’ of the team.Marrow usually plays No. 2 doubles with Maddie Kobelt on the next court over from Harman and Parra. Competing next to them gives her an extra dose of motivation, she said.‘They show a lot of support, and you want to win for them,’ Marrow said. ‘You want to win for yourself obviously, but you want to win for them, too, because they’ve worked so hard.’Even with the leadership of Harman and Parra, Jensen is wary of a ‘spring break hangover.’ The Orange hasn’t played since March 4, and last year’s results against this weekend’s opponents add little comfort. SU narrowly beat Binghamton 4-3 and lost to BU 6-1.With a healthy and re-energized team, Jensen is looking to send Harman and Parra out in style. Doing so will require a quick start to this weekend’s matches, something the senior doubles team will have to help provide. Harman expects she and Parra will lead the way at No. 1 doubles once more.‘To us, it’s a responsibility, something that we take very personally,’ Harman said. ‘… We want to lead them, and we want to really set the tone for the match. It’s something that we take personally and that we want to hold on our shoulders.’When Harman and Parra ultimately graduate this fall, their absence will leave a void with the team. The two have combined for more than 200 wins in their four years at SU, but their biggest contribution to the program has been intangible.Marrow said the seniors have shown their younger teammates how to play ‘the Orange way.’ Leading vocally and by example, Harman and Parra have instilled what Jensen calls ‘Orange energy’ in the rest of the team.Heading into the first of SU’s last four matches, the Orange’s final home match of the season represents the end of the seniors’ careers at Drumlins and the excitement that comes with the conclusion of their historic careers.‘It’s going to be a weird feeling, but I’m excited to close a very proud chapter of my life and open up a brand-new one,’ Harman [email protected]center_img Published on March 20, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_last_img read more

19
Dec
2019

Venter Group Plagiarizes Genetic Code

first_imgIs plagiarism a form of intelligent design?  We think of intelligent design in terms of God and creation, but in generic terms, I.D. only refers to purposeful, designed action by an agent – any agent, large or small, good or evil.  A planned murder, for instance, can be an evil form of intelligent design.  A forensic team can use design detection techniques to ferret out the evidence between death by murder over death by natural causes.  In the same way, an attorney general can determine, using design detection techniques, whether an ad campaign broke copyright laws, and a professor can discern whether a student borrowed someone else’s material to write a term paper.  The news is filled with dramatic announcements that Craig Venter’s lab has created an organism with the first “synthetic genome.”  How should this achievement, dramatic and groundbreaking though it is, be understood?Live Science headlined the story, “First Live Organism with Synthetic Genome Created.”  The word “created” was emphatic in the article; “the J. Craig Venter Institute says they have succeeded in creating the first living organism with a completely synthetic genome.”  It almost sounds like the lab created something entirely new from scratch – “artificial life.”  New Scientist even used religious overtones, dubbing it an “Immaculate Creation.”  A closer look, though, shows that the “synthetic genome” still used the 4-letter code of a living bacterium, and used its own transcription and translation machinery.  It would be a little like a programmer inserting a USB drive with a program into an existing computer; the computer has to have the operating system and software to recognize the code.  This is a far cry from making a computer with its own code and operating system, like the terms “artificial life” and “completely synthetic genome” imply.  Science Daily’s headline was a little more accurate, saying, “Scientists ‘Boot Up’ a Bacterial Cell With a Synthetic Genome,” but even then, Venter’s team relied on an operating system and coding system that was already defined.The Venter Institute found out some things about genomes by experience.  Notably, they are not very forgiving.  “Even a tiny inaccuracy could prevent the inert DNA from activating into a live bacterium, making accuracy paramount,” the Live Science article recounted.  “At one point, a single base pair mistake set the entire program back three months.”  The team also added panic code that would kill the organism if it left the lab, and took part in a bioethical review before the project.  “It’s part of an ongoing process that we’ve been driving, trying to make sure that the science proceeds in an ethical fashion, that we’re being thoughtful about what we do and looking forward to the implications to the future,” Venter said.Unlike surreptitious plagiarizers, the Venter Institute proudly planted watermarks in their genome.  “The researchers deliberately inserted four sequences of DNA that serve as watermarks so they could distinguish between the naturally occurring and synthetic bacteria,”  Live Science reported.  “The watermarks contain a code that translates DNA into English letters with punctuation, allowing the scientists to literally write messages with the genes.”  So what did they write?  The 46 researchers included their names, and the names of some famous scientists, “and a URL that anyone who deciphers the code can e-mail.”Geneticists keep walking right into the I.D. trap.  Why don’t they acknowledge it?  If an alien civilization discovered Venter’s genome, and read the names, would they be justified in making an inference to design?  Of course.  Then why would they be forced, according to the rules of the NCSE and the Darwin Party, to say that the explanation for the genetic code itself is blind chance and necessity?  A message is a message.  A function is a function.  If the function of a URL is to allow a human to send an email, and the function of a signal transduction system is to send a hormone to a chromosome to stop or start transcription of a gene, what’s the difference?  These are both examples of messages that carry out functions.  Are we to assume that Venter’s lab found it worthwhile to plagiarize chaos?  That would be like a professor giving a student an F for turning in a term paper that plagiarized gibberish.Another lesson from this story is to avoid news media hype.  This is an incremental step, not a breakthrough.  Geneticists have been doing genetic engineering for years, including genetic watermarking.  Scientists have inserted genes for insulin in bacteria, and genes for spider silk in goats.  Venter’s lab has taken existing genes from bacteria and performed some reverse engineering on it, then inserted it back into the hardware of a living cell.  Any way you look at it, it’s intelligent design.  Venter, your work owes nothing to the Darwin Party and its ideology.  Get on board with the I.D. Movement and give credit where credit is due.(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

18
Dec
2019

Finding our way again: South Africa’s Aids journey

first_imgAs South Africa prepares to host the International Aids Conference for the second time, it’s worth reflecting on the massive strides the nation has made in combatting the pandemic in the last 16 years – and the challenges we still face, writes Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, co-chair of the South African National Aids Council. Cyril Ramaphosa, South Africa’s deputy president and co-chair of the South African National Aids CouncilSixteen years ago an 11-year-old South African boy, tiny for his age, stood alone on a huge stage. He had a microphone in his hand and a smile on his face. And he spoke truth to power.“I hate having Aids because I get very sick,” he said. “I get very sad when I think of all the other children and babies that are sick with Aids… Babies are dying very quickly…”The occasion was the 13th International Aids Conference, held in Durban in July 2000. The boy was Nkosi Johnson. He died just a few months later.This year, as South Africa prepares to host the International Aids Conference for the second time – in Durban again, from 18 to 22 July – it’s worth reflecting how different Nkosi Johnson’s story would have been today.Since then, South Africa has done much to tackle HIV, rolling out the world’s largest treatment programme to its citizens and improving primary healthcare. Sixteen years ago HIV infection was a death sentence, particularly for the poor and vulnerable – and especially children. In 2000, in South Africa, the lifetime risk of dying of Aids was as high as 50%.Today HIV is a chronic condition, controlled as many chronic conditions are – such as diabetes – with medication. Children like Nkosi Johnson, infected at birth, now live, flourish and grow into healthy adults.This progress, and the lives saved, is borne out by South Africa’s life expectancy. After years of steady improvement in the late 20th century, it suddenly dropped to a low of 51.7 years in 2005. At the same time countries such as India and Brazil continued their steady rise.Thanks to our HIV treatment programme, life expectancy has begun to rise again. Today, Statistics South Africa puts our life expectancy at 60.6 years for men and 64.3 years for women.Why the change? What happened in 2005? In 2005 South Africa embraced the problem with energy, rolling out a massive antiretroviral treatment programme through its public health system.Today our response to HIV is framed by broad global policy – including our own National Development Plan, the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the UN Sustainable Development Goals – to vigorously provide comprehensive treatment and care to as many as possible.We know treatment alone is not enough. Our policies and programmes also aim to change risky behaviour and find solutions to the social and economic conditions that make people vulnerable to HIV infection.In 2010, the fight against the epidemic was ramped up with the launch of the world’s biggest programme to test for infection, the HIV Counselling and Testing campaign. Within 18 months of the launch of the campaign, which is ongoing, a full 18 million South Africans, over a third of the country’s population, had tested and knew their HIV status.Today, about 10 million South Africans take the test every year. Testing is a major weapon in the fight against HIV. Simply knowing they are HIV-positive makes people far less likely to risk infecting others.The fruits of South Africa’s decade-long fight against HIV can also be found elsewhere. Aids-related deaths have declined from 345 600 in 2005 – when the disease claimed half of all deaths in the country – to 151 000 in 2014, when 29.2% of all deaths were Aids-related.Significantly, the transmission of the virus from mother to child during or after birth has dropped from 70 000 babies in 2004 to fewer than 7 000 in 2015.In 2000, when South Africa hosted the International Aids Conference for the first time, people living with HIV had no access to treatment and the country was under attack by the global community for its stance on HIV and Aids.Today, we have more than 3 million people on publicly funded antiretroviral treatment. We aim to have 4,2 million people on treatment in the next two years.But HIV is a powerful enemy. There are still problems to be unearthed and tackled. One is a worrying prevalence of new HIV infection in adolescent girls and young women. It is estimated that some 2,000 young women aged 15 to 24 are infected by HIV in South Africa every week. This is by far the highest rate of infection in any age or sex category – and one of the highest infection rates in the world.HIV thrives in conditions of ignorance and poverty, and in situations of gender inequality. This infection rate is intertwined with other critical social problems directly experienced by South Africa’s young people: high rates of teenage pregnancy, high school drop-out rates, widespread sexual violence and high youth unemployment.In an effort to tackle the problem, in late June 2016 South Africa launched the National Campaign for Girls and Young Women. This aims to fight practices that put adolescent girls and young women at risk of HIV, such as unsafe sex, destructive behaviour, and drug and alcohol abuse.Another goal is to build adolescent girls and young women’s confidence and resilience, and give them greater economic opportunities. It will also target men, encouraging them to help effect the crucial, fundamental change in South Africans’ sexual behaviour.Working with NGOs and local Aids councils, the new campaign will encourage men – both young and older – to use condoms, stick to one sexual partner and not prey on young girls and women. It will task men with joining the call for safer sexual behaviour and an end to violence and the abuse of women.The project is supported by over $140 million in funding from the US and German governments and the Global Fund. It will be rolled out over the next three years to 51 municipalities with the highest incidence of new HIV infections. At its core is the principle that our best weapon in South Africa’s new battle against HIV and Aids is knowledge and education.It is clear that having the largest treatment programme on the planet isn’t enough. As we welcome the world to the 21st annual International Aids Conference on 18 July – Nelson Mandela Day – we must remember that it is only through education that we will find our path towards an Aids-free generation.last_img read more

28
Nov
2019

Sushil provides the silver lining on last day, raises India’s medal count at London Olympics to six

first_imgSushil Kumar scripted history on Sunday as he became the first Indian athlete to win back-to-back Olympic medals, though the silver effort in the 66kg final did not leave him too pleased.Egged on by a huge crowd in an atmosphere resembling a Roman amphitheater, a dehydrated Sushil fought his heart out all day long before a strong Japanese opponent in the final answering to the name of Tatsuhiro Yonemitsu stopped him.This was a day full of expectations when people kept talking about only “gold”. Yet, at the end of the Games, with India’s medal tally reading two silver and four bronze medals, there is plenty of reason to celebrate.For hundreds of Indian supporters inside the arena and millions back home, this was a day when the prayer was Sushil wins gold.The way the champion fought all day long, with a superlative effort coming in the semi-final against Kazakhstan’s Akzhurek Tanatarov, Sushil had raised huge hopes.However, in the 66kg final, against Tatshuiro, Sushil looked tired. Tatsuhiro, who had won gold in the same category at the Guangzhou Asian Games, was too explosive.The strategy was simple and the Japanese wrestler went on the offensive from the start and earned a valuable point in the first round itself.In the second round, Tatsuhiro showed amazing guts and power as he lifted Sushil and dropped him to the ground. With a minute for the bout to end, it was clear Sushil had no energy to fight back.As the referee signalled victory for the star from the land of the rising sun, Sushil was dejected. The Indian slapped both his palms on his thighs and took slow, measured steps back to his coaches.advertisementAt the medal ceremony, too, Sushil never smiled as he was presented the silver medal. As he came out of the arena and walked to the waiting media, Sushil’s expressions changed.The half smile reappeared on his face and he had reason to as he is the first Indian to win two individual Olympic medals. The TV scribes wanted to grab him and the print media was also were hungry for bytes. “Yes, I had loose motions. As a sportsperson, I have to take it in my stride. It’s part of the game,” said Sushil.But the champion was not going to offer ill health as an excuse. “I had problems in the final but I have no excuses. Yes, our national anthem was not played and I would have loved to hear that,” said Sushil.Reflecting on the journey from Beijing to London, Sushil was nostalgic. “I wish to thank all the people for their love and wishes and those who prayed for me. I wish to thank my guru Satpal and my parents. I also wish to thank each one of my support staff,” he said as if it was a thanksgiving speech.Stressing on the importance of coaches, masseurs, doctors and others who assist him, Sushil said: “You see me only competing in the centre of the stage. But I have a huge support team which backs me, and they are the ones who also need to be praised.”Before I came to London I told you (the media) we will do well in wrestling and see I changed the colour of my medal. Not just that, India won two medals in wrestling and I am happy Yogeshwar also did well.”I can assure you, in future Olympics, we will do even better,” concluded Sushil.So how was Sushil going to celebrate? “I wish to rest now. The last five months have been very hectic. I need to recover well and then think of celebrations,” said the modest man.This was a day when Sushil caught the attention of all from early morning itself as he downed Beijing Olympics gold medallist Sahin Ramazan from Turkey.Having beaten the defending champion, expectations grew that Sushil would continue till the end. But the real drama came in the semi-finals when it appeared Sushil was down and out against Kazakhstan’s Akzhurek Tanatarov.However, in the second round, Sushil gathered his breath and in one clean action lifted and threw his opponent.With the Kazakh seen bleeding from the right ear there were rumours if Sushil had bit his opponent. Replays suggested the injury took place during the normal course of the bout and Sushil had not indulged in any foul play.last_img read more

17
Sep
2019

Bahamas PM calls for stop to no cut off list for Govt

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, September 20, 2017 – Nassau – There are mixed reactions to the move by Prime Minister Hubert Minnis and Minister responsible for Bahamas Power and Light to do away with preferential treatment for Government MPs and Ministers.   Most agree that there should not be any special treatment shown to government or elected officials, that just like all others in The Bahamas they should pay their electricity bills and pay them on time.A string of media articles citing that there is a list of PLP and FNM former ministers and MPs who have exorbitant power bills was confirmed by minister responsible, Desmond Bannister.   While Bannister refused to name the names to at least one publication, another is doing what it usually does and boldly lists who is believed to be on that list and the kind of money they owe; all but one are PLPs.It is said that owed to BPL are tens of thousands of dollars by some of the most vociferous political figures in the country; unpaid are their bills while regular folks can see their electricity supply cut off for far less.    Those commenting on the news reports believe the move strikes a balance and brings about equity; something Minister Bannister shared that the other PM Hubert Alexander also promoted.Others say it is still political interference and believe the Government should stay out of it.   In any event, letters for immediate payment by those individuals on the now infamous list have been issued.#MagneticMediaNewslast_img read more

31
Aug
2019

Painting forty years that brushed past IndoKorea

first_imgCommemorating the forty years long diplomatic ties between Korea and India, Spirit of Forms, an art exhibition is set out to feature acclaimed artists from both the countries. Curated by Minjoo lee and Kalicharan Gupta, the artistic melange will be on display, carrying paintings from twenty nine Korean and Indian artists from 4th May onwards.Entwining the essence of the art forms, the exhibition brings across the love and friendship between the people of the two nations. None of the artistic masterpieces is static; none a mere repitition of the already arrived at forms. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The message is clear; art is a journey, for art’s sake; artistics go on through the melee of crossroads and intersections without halting at stops. Its evident in the works of Jai Zharotia and Niren Sen Gupta, the participants in this event; while Jai delights us with apparitions of poetic strangeness every time he puts brush to canvas or paper, Niren revisits chapters of our own spiritual odyssey, giving peace an honoured place in his artistic ruminations. The cultural heritage of Korea coupled with ancient artistic traditions of India will be a treat to watch for the art lovers in the capital. DETAILTimings: 11 to 7pm, When: 4 May to 15 MayWhere: Dhoomimal Art Centre, Connaught Placelast_img read more