Tagged: 宁波哪个水会服务可以

20
Apr
2021

Indy 500 will happen without fans in the stands

first_img Pinterest Facebook By Tommie Lee – August 4, 2020 0 493 Indy 500 will happen without fans in the stands The Ruoff Mortgage logo appears prominently on Sato’s jacket. (“takuma sato” by Zach Catanzareti Photo, Public Domain) The echo at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway will be a bit more pronounced this month.Roger Penske has reversed the previous decision, and fans will NOT be allowed in the stands at the 104th running off The Greatest Spectacle In Racing.The race will be the first without spectators, and has already been moved from Memorial Day weekend to August 23 due to the pandemic.Penske originally said he wouldn’t run the race without fans, and decided to limit capacity to 50%, then 25%. The continued rise in cases in Indiana — and especially in Marion County — caused Penske to make the announcement Tuesday. Twitter WhatsApp Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Google+ Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNationalNewsSouth Bend MarketSports Previous articleNotre Dame plans a mass for the beginning of the University yearNext articleDispensation from Mass extended to November Tommie Leelast_img read more

28
Sep
2020

Maersk Oil Hires Simmons Edeco for Wellhead & Valve Maintenance

first_imgSimmons Edeco has been awarded a contract to provide scheduled and unscheduled wellhead maintenance services for all Maersk Oil offshore wells in the Danish North Sea.In addition, Simmons Edeco is to refurbish valves and wellhead maintenance equipment, and manage major and consignment stock.The five-year contract, which started on June 1, 2017, features three one-year options to renew. Simmons Edeco is supporting the contract from its new operations base in Esbjerg, Denmark.“We are pleased to have been given the opportunity by Maersk Oil to contribute to the smooth operation of their wells in the Danish North Sea, and look forward to working with them,” said Gavin Sherwood, business development manager for Simmons Edeco.last_img read more

17
Sep
2020

TENNIS : Seniors Harman, Parra prepare for last home match of season

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ The feeling is starting to sink in for Alessondra Parra and Emily Harman. By the end of this weekend, they will have played their last home matches in a Syracuse uniform.For Parra, this weekend’s matches are a cold reminder that her time at SU is almost up.‘I feel like my time at Syracuse has gone really quickly, and this is kind of a realization that it’s going to be over soon,’ Parra said.After travel budget restrictions forced Army to cancel next Sunday’s match at Drumlins Tennis Center, this weekend’s home matches against Binghamton and Boston University will be the last for the senior duo. The last homestand is special for Harman and Parra as well as their young teammates. With an NCAA bid on the line in every remaining match, though, No. 47 SU (10-4, 5-1 Big East) has little time to reflect.‘I got to spend time with Emily and Alessondra for two years now, so it’s going to be a very sensitive moment,’ sophomore Aleah Morrow said. ‘But, you know, we’re gonna go out there, be ready to compete, be ready to get the win.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter a deflating 5-2 loss to then-No. 59 William & Mary on Feb. 24, head coach Luke Jensen decided to play Harman and Parra together at No. 1 doubles. The pair knocked off ranked doubles team Hanna Yu and Vicky Brook of then-No. 25 Yale to help the Orange register a historic victory.The senior doubles tandem and the SU team haven’t lost since.Having Harman and Parra at the top doubles spot strengthens the entire team. Jensen considers the veteran duo the ‘compass’ of the team.Marrow usually plays No. 2 doubles with Maddie Kobelt on the next court over from Harman and Parra. Competing next to them gives her an extra dose of motivation, she said.‘They show a lot of support, and you want to win for them,’ Marrow said. ‘You want to win for yourself obviously, but you want to win for them, too, because they’ve worked so hard.’Even with the leadership of Harman and Parra, Jensen is wary of a ‘spring break hangover.’ The Orange hasn’t played since March 4, and last year’s results against this weekend’s opponents add little comfort. SU narrowly beat Binghamton 4-3 and lost to BU 6-1.With a healthy and re-energized team, Jensen is looking to send Harman and Parra out in style. Doing so will require a quick start to this weekend’s matches, something the senior doubles team will have to help provide. Harman expects she and Parra will lead the way at No. 1 doubles once more.‘To us, it’s a responsibility, something that we take very personally,’ Harman said. ‘… We want to lead them, and we want to really set the tone for the match. It’s something that we take personally and that we want to hold on our shoulders.’When Harman and Parra ultimately graduate this fall, their absence will leave a void with the team. The two have combined for more than 200 wins in their four years at SU, but their biggest contribution to the program has been intangible.Marrow said the seniors have shown their younger teammates how to play ‘the Orange way.’ Leading vocally and by example, Harman and Parra have instilled what Jensen calls ‘Orange energy’ in the rest of the team.Heading into the first of SU’s last four matches, the Orange’s final home match of the season represents the end of the seniors’ careers at Drumlins and the excitement that comes with the conclusion of their historic careers.‘It’s going to be a weird feeling, but I’m excited to close a very proud chapter of my life and open up a brand-new one,’ Harman [email protected]center_img Published on March 20, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_last_img read more

17
Sep
2020

Academic Senate votes in favor of two-day break

first_imgThe Academic Senate voted in favor of instituting a two-day break in the eighth week of the fall semester on Wednesday. The resolution will now be presented to President C. L.  Max Nikias, Provost Michael Quick, Vice President for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry and Director of Campus Activities Gabriel Valenzuela. There is still no set time when this fall break could be integrated into the USC academic calendar. According to the former Undergraduate Student Government President Edwin Saucedo, efforts to pass the resolution have been underway for several months. He said the passing of the resolution through the Academic Senate was the culmination of the work of many previous USG leaders who had also attempted to institute the break. “This is a resolution that has gone through our student government for the last three or four years, so it’s something that’s been in the works since I remember arriving at USC,” Saucedo said. “Without the professors and the Academic Senate on board, this is not a possibility because the fall break does not just affect students, but professors teaching the students as well.” In the period between Labor Day and Thanksgiving break, USC students have 56 consecutive instructional days, one of the longest among elite universities. The extended educational period has inflicted undue stress and anxiety on students. “We were looking at the fact that USC is a top 25 school with a semester system, and it has the longest academic semester,” Saucedo said. “Looking at the state of mental health on our campus, a lot of students struggle with stress and being able to juggle school and a social life and work and career opportunities. We wanted to model after the spring semester where we have continuous breaks.” USG worked in conjunction with the Engemann Student Health Center to gather data on students. Counseling Services reported that appointments at the health center reach a semester-high between weeks 10 and 12, which does not align with the Center for Disease Control’s reported flu season. “We’re looking at when are students the most stressed and frequenting the Health Center the most,” Saucedo said. “We saw a spike up in the eighth through 10th weeks. Choosing the eighth week allowed us to be proactive as opposed to reactive. Having a break in the 10th or 11th week might be too late to really solve the issue that we’re trying to get at.” Saucedo credited the approval to the increased awareness of the importance of mental health on campus and greater conversation surrounding students’ well-being. “Over the last couple of years, the conversation around mental health on campus has really changed,” Saucedo said. “Ideally, we want to continue providing more resources for our students. It’s OK to be stressed but also OK to ask for help.”last_img read more

28
Aug
2020

Protesters march down Chisholm street to fight against hate

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisALPENA, Mich –Outraged at the discriminatory remarks toward the LGBTQ+ community, protesters marched from Michigan Works to Biggby Coffee where signage supporting king was displayed.Their voices were filled with passion as they chanted, “T.K no way” and “Love not hate.”Protest organizer Suzy Langeveld said this was her first time organizing a march and it was fueled by the severity of kings threats.According to Langeveld, King sent derogatory text messages to his daughter after seeing two men holding hands at a wedding.One supporter spoke on the importance of values in their elected officials.Not everyone who showed up today was there with the intent to support as one person began shouting through a bullhorn at the protesters.Langeveld says she has experienced more push back for who she is here in Northeast Michigan than from her hometown of Detroit.Hoping to see change with the upcoming election in August,  she is encouraging people to be informed when voting.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Besser Museum had soft opening to welcome visitorsNext Goodies Vintage Tea Shop recognizing old Alpena againlast_img read more