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14
Jun
2021

Washington Offers More Pandemic Assistance to More Types of Ag Producers

first_img SHARE Previous articleHAT Market Analysis for 3/25/21 with Mike Silver, Kokomo GrainNext articleHouse Ag Hearing Focuses on Black Farmers Andy Eubank Washington Offers More Pandemic Assistance to More Types of Ag Producers SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Washington Offers More Pandemic Assistance to More Types of Ag Producers By Andy Eubank – Mar 25, 2021 Audio Playerhttps://hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/More-ag-pandemic-assistance.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.USDA has a new COVID-19 related initiative to provide assistance to a broader group of agriculture producers who have been impacted by market disruptions. Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack says the USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers will dedicate at least $6 billion toward the new programs.“The whole goal here is to make sure that when we’re providing Covid relief we recognize that it has impacted and affected virtually every aspect of agriculture and the supply chain,” he said. “We’re trying to do our best along with the American Rescue Plan to do what we can to bolster that supply chain, to provide the help and assistance to keep people on the farm and to make sure it is equitably administered.”Vilsack says cattle producers are in line for more assistance.“Payments will involve under CFAP1 payments to cattle producers. They don’t need to apply. They don’t need to take additional steps. This is essentially providing additional resources to what we anticipate would be about 410,000 producers, about $1.1 billion of additional help. Rates for these producers will be published on the website farmers.gov/cfap. I would encourage cattle producers to take a look at that to determine how much they might be entitled to in addition to and above what they’ve already received.”USDA is developing rules for new programs that will emphasize outreach to small and socially disadvantaged producers, specialty crop and organic producers, timber harvesters, as well as provide support for the food supply chain and producers of renewable fuel.Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor welcomed the biofuels portion of the announcement, saying the assistance has been long-awaited as biofuel producers were some of the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. At one point over half of the industry was offline.Existing programs like the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) will fall within the new initiative and, where statutory authority allows, will be refined to better address the needs of producers.USDA will reopen sign-up for CFAP 2 for at least 60 days beginning on April 5, 2021, and the payments announced this week will go out under the existing CFAP rules.Additional information and announcements for this USDA Pandemic Assistance to Producers initiative are coming, some detail is available now at www.farmers.gov.last_img read more

01
Mar
2021

Arresting images

first_imgIt might not seem that the live helicopter feed of Los Angeles police cruisers trailing O.J. Simpson’s white Bronco has much in common with the Sacco and Vanzetti murder trial. But a new exhibit at the Harvard Law School (HLS) Library shows that America’s appetite for tawdry and salacious crime reporting existed long before “Dateline NBC” ever did.“Extra! Extra! Read All About It: A Tale of True Crime” explores the exploitative history of crime and the American media, a relationship that began in the mid-1800s when a public fascination with true crime emerged, largely stemming from the popularization of serialized crime literature in the penny press. Curated by Lesley Schoenfeld, coordinator of public services and visual collections, the exhibit showcases this literature, published in both newspapers and books around the country, as well as the media’s depictions of three prominent historical crimes: Massachusetts’ child serial killer Jesse Pomeroy, the Lindbergh kidnapping, and the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti.“I knew I wanted to curate an exhibit on crime,” said Schoenfeld, who turned to the library’s historical and special collections to create the compact but compelling exhibit housed in two exhibit cases in the Library’s Caspersen Room. “I remembered this scholar who came to the library to research Sacco and Vanzetti last summer, and I contacted her to see if she would be willing to help out with the exhibit and expand on some of the research.”That scholar was Michele Fazio, an assistant professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, whose research was concerned with the media’s portrayal of family in the Sacco and Vanzetti case. The press’s fascination centered, unsurprisingly, on the breakup of the Sacco household. Photographs of Nicola Sacco’s wife, Rosina, and their children served as both a gut-wrenching reminder of crime’s repercussions and a manipulative means to sell newspapers.In one photograph, Rosina walks, head slightly bowed, out from the courthouse. That was the authentic version — but a second, doctored photo made its way out into the media frenzy. Captioned “the end of the road,” the composite image was meant to show Rosina leaving the Charlestown prison, presumably after an emotional visit with her husband.Other exhibit items include records from the Wood Detective Agency, New England’s first private detective firm, which follow proprietor and former Boston detective James R. Wood’s recollections of his dealings with Pomeroy. Juxtaposed with his own account are subsequent recountings of the crime from an 1892 book and a 1930s Boston newspaper.“When you work with such an amazing collection, it can be hard to know what to highlight,” said Schoenfeld. “Based on the response we have been getting, I think this is a topic that speaks to a lot of people’s interests, and I am really grateful for the opportunity it gave me to work with one of our researchers.”“True Crime” is on view through April 26.last_img read more

01
Mar
2021

Tracking the proteins before Alzheimer’s takes hold

first_imgImportantly, when the scientists followed 104 participants for two years, they found that people with the highest initial levels of tau at the point of origin exhibited the most spread of tau throughout the brain over time.The findings suggest that PET measurements of tau focused on precisely individualized specific brain regions may predict an individual’s risk of future tau accumulation and consequent Alzheimer’s disease. Targeting tau when detected at an early stage might prevent the condition or slow its progression.“Clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of anti-tau therapeutics would benefit from an automated, individualized imaging method to select cognitively normal individuals vulnerable to impending tau spread, thus advancing our efforts to provide effective interventions for patients at risk for Alzheimer’s disease,” says Sanchez.This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health. Related Environment counts, Alzheimer’s research suggests Why some people are resistant to Alzheimer’s Team works to detect disease early using electronic health records An algorithm to help predict Alzheimer’scenter_img Exposure to new activities may delay onset of dementia “We hypothesized that applying our method to PET images would enable us to detect the initial accumulation of cortical tau in cognitively normal people, and to track the spread of tau from this original location to other brain regions in association with amyloid-beta deposition and the cognitive impairment of Alzheimer’s disease,” explains Sanchez. He notes that cortical tau, when it spreads from its site of origin to neocortical brain regions under the influence of amyloid-beta, appears to be the “bullet” that injures brains in Alzheimer’s disease.The technique revealed that tau deposits first emerge in the rhinal cortex region of the brain, independently from amyloid-beta deposits, before spreading to the nearby temporal neocortex. “We observed initial cortical tau accumulation at this site of origin in cognitively normal individuals without evidence of elevated amyloid-beta, as early as 58 years old,” says Sanchez. Researchers find gene variants that may help to protect against the disease Amyloid-beta and tau are the two key abnormal protein deposits that accumulate in the brain during the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and detecting their buildup at an early stage may allow clinicians to intervene before the condition has a chance to take hold.A team led by investigators at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has now developed an automated method that can identify and track the development of harmful tau deposits in a patient’s brain. The research, which is published in Science Translational Medicine, could lead to earlier diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease.“While our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease has increased greatly in recent years, many attempts to treat the condition so far have failed, possibly because medical interventions have taken place after the stage at which the brain injury becomes irreversible,” says lead author Justin Sanchez, a data analyst at MGH’s Gordon Center for Medical Imaging.In an attempt to develop a method for earlier diagnosis, Sanchez and his colleagues, under the leadership of Keith A. Johnson of the departments of radiology and neurology at MGH, evaluated brain images of amyloid-beta and tau obtained by positron emission tomography, or PET, in 443 adults participating in several observational studies of aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Participants spanned a wide range of ages, with varying degrees of amyloid-beta and cognitive impairment — from healthy 20-year-olds to older patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s dementia. The researchers used an automated method to identify the brain region most vulnerable to initial cortical tau buildup in each individual PET scan. ”…many attempts to treat [Alzheimer’s] so far have failed, possibly because medical interventions have taken place after the stage at which the brain injury becomes irreversible.” — Justin Sanchez, lead authorlast_img read more