Tagged: 上海龙凤楼风桑拿

31
Aug
2019

The world of the new

first_imgUchaan is a team of young visionaries, in search of youthful upcoming talent. The thought behind the Uchaan can be summarized in the words of Jyoti Kalra, the founder of Uchaan- ‘The main spirit working behind Uchaan is to bring visibility and credibility to the works of deserving talented artists who have the potential to make it big in the mainstream discourse.’ Shringaar will be focusing upon the work of a heterogeneous group of artists with many prominent names in the art world. The exhibition will form a bricolage of traditional, abstracts and contemporary art and through its variegated portrayals, initiate the celebration of ornamentation of women through its various forms. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’SC Ahuja, one of the key artists behind this art show claims, ‘While the focus of the initial exhibition was uninhibited expression of womanhood, the present exhibition focuses on presentation of variegated facets of nature, human life and their reciprocity which is a fitting tribute to women and embellishment of her beauty through the latest exhibition.’  WHEN: 25 July to 28 July, 11 am to 7 pmWHERE: Gold Souk Mall, Araya Samaj Road, Block-C, Sec 43, Sushant Lok, Gurgaonlast_img read more

31
Aug
2019

8th Theatre Olympics turn Delhi evenings dramatic

first_imgWith the 8th theatre Olympics in its last phase, Delhi evenings will be full of drama. Organised by the National School of Drama (NSD), under the aegis of Ministry of Culture, Government of India, this 51-day long festival aims to bridge borders and bring people of different cultures, beliefs and ideologies together through the medium of theatrical art. This is the first time that a theatre festival of this magnitude is being organised in India.’The misunderstanding’ by Albert Camus Also Read – Add new books to your shelf’The Misunderstanding’ (Hindi play by Director Aruja Srivastava) at Abhimanch, NSD (8:30 pm onwards), will see a son, who for 22 years, has been living in an unnamed land, returns to Europe to visit his mother and his sister, Martha. He comes with his wife, Maria, and decides not to disclose his true identity. This is unfortunate, because the two women, who run a lonely inn, murder their guests and rob them for survival. The only other character is the mute manservant, who in the final scene is Camus’ stand-in for God. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive’The diary of anne frank’ by Deborah Although this theatre extravaganza is in its last phase, dozens of theatre performances still await. On March 28, at Sri Ram Centre, The Diary of Anne Frank – an English play by Deborah Meola – will chronicle the true story of Anne Frank and her family while they were hiding in during the Holocaust. For two years they lived in a secret annexe with Mr Frank’s business partner, Mr Van Daan, his wife and son, and a dentist, Mr Dussel all Jews trying to escape the Nazis. While in hiding, Anne struggles with the challenges of being a teenager: schooling, parental relationships, maturing from child to adult, and falling in love. These challenges are heightened by the experience of being locked away with seven other people in one room for two years. Moments from these years are shared with the audience through the words of Anne Frank’s actual diary. ‘Almost alive’ by Sabine MolenaarIn ‘Almost Alive’, director Sabine Molenaar, she wonders what would happen when you withdraw yourself from the turmoil of the outside world and enter a timeless and boundless inner world. So she moves further away from reality and towards that dark place, where shelter and true peace of mind await her. Yet chaos and disorientation are also lurking. Slowly pulsating basses invite you into this shadowy universe.The 55 minutes long play , which organically merges dance, video-mapping and animatronics, music and light will be performed at Kamani Auditorium (6:30 pm onwards) by Sandman/Sabine Molenaar group.last_img read more

31
Aug
2019

Brain works backwards to retrieve memories

first_imgWhen we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a study which could help assess the reliability of eye witness accounts of crime scenes. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, reconstructed the memory retrieval process, using brain decoding techniques. These techniques make it possible to track when in time a unique memory is being reactivated in the brain, said researchers from the University of Birmingham in the UK. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfUnderstanding more precisely how the brain retrieves information could help better assess the reliability of eye witness accounts, for example of crime scenes, where people often are able to recall the overall ‘gist’ of an event, but recall specific visual details less reliably. The researchers found that, when retrieving information about a visual object, the brain focuses first on the core meaning – recovering the ‘gist’ – and only afterwards recalls more specific details. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThis is in sharp contrast to how the brain processes images when it first encounters them. When we initially see a complex object, it is the visual details – patterns and colours – that we perceive first. Abstract, meaningful information that tells us the nature of the object we are looking at, whether it is a dog, a guitar, or a cup, for example, comes later. “We know that our memories are not exact replicas of the things we originally experienced,” said Juan Linde Domingo, lead author of the study. “Memory is a reconstructive process, biased by personal knowledge and world views — sometimes we even remember events that never actually happened. But exactly how memories are reconstructed in the brain, step by step, is currently not well understood,” Domingo said. During the study, participants saw images of specific objects, and then learned to associate each image with a unique reminder word, for example the word ‘spin’ or ‘pull’. The participants were later presented with the reminder word and asked to reconstruct the associated image in as much detail as possible. Brain activity was recorded throughout the task through 128 electrodes attached to the scalp, allowing the researchers to observe changes in brain patterns with millisecond precision. The researchers trained a computer algorithm to decode what kind of image the participant was retrieving at different points in the task. “We were able to show that the participants were retrieving higher-level, abstract information, such as whether they were thinking of an animal or an inanimate object, shortly after they heard the reminder word,” said Maria Wimber, senior author of the study. “It was only later that they retrieved the specific details, for example whether they had been looking at a colour object, or a black and white outline,” Wimber said.last_img read more