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12
May
2021

Data centers poised for record year of leasing

first_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tags Commercial Real EstateData CentersE-commerceTechnology Share via Shortlink A 351,000 square-foot data center in Ohio. (H5 Data Centers)Data centers appear poised for record growth this year.A recent CBRE report found that demand is strong, and preleasing suggests 2021 a sustained surge, CNBC reported.Data centers  — essentially large warehouses filled with computing and data storage systems — are measured in power instead of square footage.“We know that there’s already 500 megawatts of new build coming online now, almost 70 percent of which is pre-leased,” said CBRE’s Spencer Levy. “And so we do believe that 2021 might be the record year, and then we’ll accelerate thereafter.”The pandemic’s economic volatility prompted companies to freeze their information technology budgets, causing demand for data centers to dip 11 percent. Despite that, 2020 was still the second-best year on record for leasing, according to CBRE. Data center real estate investment trusts were also the best performing REIT sector in the last year.ADVERTISEMENTDigital Realty Trust, a $41 billion real estate company and one the country’s largest data-center developers, is developing a 600,000-square-foot compound. That announcement, made in the fall, came as it received a major commitment from Bloomberg LP, the parent of Bloomberg News.Levy said that demand for so-called “edge computing” purposes, like self-driving cars, and remote working outside major cities served by local data centers, will accelerate demand moving forward.[CNBC] — Dennis Lynch last_img read more

12
May
2021

Plans for 23-story Upper West Side project are back on

first_img Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Renderings of development. (City of New York)Plans to build a 23-story building on Manhattan’s Upper West Side are back on after stalling in 2019.Fetner Properties re-filed plans for the development at 270 West 96th Street, which will have 171 apartments and space for a community facility, Crain’s reported.Fetner will begin construction on the 235-foot-tall, 150,000-square-foot building during the fourth quarter of the year, according to the publication. It may take about 28 months to complete the project.The last update about Fetner’s project came in 2019 after the company received unanimous approval by Community Board 7’s land use committee, I Love the Upper West Side reported. At the time, plans were for 6,500 square feet of the 8,000-square-foot community facility to be occupied by the Salvation Army, the publication added.ADVERTISEMENTThe 2019 proposal called for 80 micro-units and 91 traditional apartments. Forty percent of the units were to be permanently affordable.Construction in New York was slowed last year by the pandemic, with filings for new buildings totaling about 42.7 million square feet, down 28 percent from the previous year, according to a report by the Real Estate Board of New York.Read moreThe 10 biggest new project filings in NYCWorst of the worst: The real estate disasters of 2020Eichner’s Crown Heights rezoning delayed once again [Crain’s] — Cordilia JamesContact Cordilia James Share via Shortlink Email Address* Tags Message* DevelopmentResidential Real Estateupper west sidelast_img read more

12
May
2021

Investors increasingly compete with first-time buyers for homes

first_img(iStock/Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)Another housing bubble is inflating — but unlike the one that burst in 2008, buyers contributing to this bubble are less likely to live in those properties. This time, investors are pouring money into the growing single-family home rental market.Investors have been gobbling up distressed single-family homes in the wake of the Great Recession, which led to foreclosures on hundreds of thousands of homes. But as the supply of those distressed properties dried up, investors — including private equity firms and pension funds — are competing with first-time homebuyers in the resale market, the Wall Street Journal reported.“You now have permanent capital competing with a young couple trying to buy a house,” John Burns, CEO of John Burns Real Estate Consulting, told the publication, noting that about one in every five houses sold is bought by someone who won’t live there. “That’s going to make U.S. housing permanently more expensive.”Home prices are expected to climb 12 percent this year, on top of last year’s 11 percent hike, according to Burns’ firm, which told the publication that another 6 percent increase will follow in 2022. The pace of appreciation is akin to what happened in 2004 and 2005.For an extreme example, look to Conroe, Texas, where D.R. Horton recently built 124 rental homes. The homebuilder rented those homes out and subsequently put the entire subdivision up for sale. A bidding war broke out in December, and Fundrise LLC, an online property-investing platform, won with its $32 million bid, which was submitted on behalf of about 150,000 individual investors.The price tag was about twice as much as D.R. Horton typically makes by selling homes to the middle class, its CFO told the Journal. [WSJ] — Akiko MatsudaRead moreHome sale prices near 100% of asking pricesD.R. Horton pays $14M for land in Jupiter and Florida City for two housing projectsInvestors building single-family rentals to meet demand Full Name* Tags D.R. HortonRental MarketResidential Real Estatesingle family homes Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Email Address* Share via Shortlink Message* Contact Akiko Matsudalast_img read more

12
May
2021

Yang targets vacant lots with $900 million tax plan

first_img Commercial Real EstateDevelopmentmayoral racePoliticstaxes With at least $1.3 billion in property taxes unpaid, and commercial building valuations (and tax bills) plunging during the pandemic, the plan would be timely, Yang said.But developers and trade groups are skeptical, arguing the tax would make properties more expensive to build out.“The city’s property tax system is fundamentally broken and we agree with Andrew Yang that it needs comprehensive reform, but this idea will not help to achieve that goal,” James Whelan, president of the Real Estate Board of New York, told the Post.Martha Stark, who was finance commissioner under Mayor Michael Bloomberg, thinks Yang could be on to something but that his math is off. She estimated the plan would raise closer to $500 million.Yang’s plan is hardly novel; tax surcharges on vacant land, storefronts and homes have been proposed for years, but never enacted.[New York Post] — Suzannah CavanaughContact Suzannah Cavanaugh Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Email Address* Tags Share via Shortlink Andrew Yang (Getty, iStock)Andrew Yang sees nearly $1 billion in untapped property tax revenue sitting in New York City’s vacant lots.The contender for mayor announced a plan Thursday to hike taxes on empty commercial lots by 500 percent over five years, the New York Post reported. The idea is to kickstart development but Yang estimated the plan could rake in $900 million a year for the city.Vacant commercial land is taxed based on a valuation of less than 20 percent of what it would actually sell for, which Yang said disincentivizes development, the Post reported. By taxing properties on their sales price, he argues, the city would rake in cash and encourage owners to build.Read moreDoes Andrew Yang’s housing plan make sense? Andrew Yang leads in early poll for New York City mayor Real estate sounds off on state’s $4.3B tax hike Message*last_img read more

09
May
2021

The terrestrial arthropod fauna of the Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands – Collembola

first_imgAs an addendum to a recent publication on the terrestrial arthropod fauna of the Byers Peninsula Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), which included preliminary identification of four Collembola, we now present detailed information on Collembola occurring within the SSSI. Five species were recorded [Friesea grisea (Schaffer), Tullbergia mixta Wahlgren, Isotoma (Folsomotoma) octooculata (Willem), Cyptopygus antarcticus Willem, and Cryptopygus sp. nov.]. Species occurrence and abundance differed between samples collected from poorly vegetated stony ground and vegetation cores. F. grisea was both the commonest (58% of individuals) and the most widely distributed (18/19 samples) springtail in the former habitat. Cryptopygus sp. nov. was recorded only in the vegetation core samples. All five species were more evenly distributed in vegetation samples, although C. antarcticus and Cryptopygus sp. nov. were again the least abundant. A list of the terrestrial arthropods of the SSSI is presented.last_img read more

09
May
2021

Antarctic mapping: a bleak future?

first_imgAntarctic cartographers face many challenges. They are required to prepare accurate maps of a remote and dangerous environment in support of science programmes, logistic operations, and search and rescue activities. Yet they have limited resources in terms of manpower, funds and primary source material for this vital work, perhaps because their science discipline is held in low esteem by their peers. They are commonly regarded as service providers rather than scientists in their own right.last_img read more

09
May
2021

Bridging the atmospheric divide

first_imgThe mesosphere and lower thermosphere have long suffered from their inaccessibility to research balloons and satellites alike. As a result, basic knowledge about this central region of the atmosphere is limited. In his Perspective, Jarvis describes how ground-based, satellite, rocket, and modeling efforts are shedding new light on this region, which is important for detecting climate change, for understanding vertical transport processes in the atmosphere, and for aerospace technology.last_img

09
May
2021

Heterotrophic microbial colonization of the interior of impact-shocked rocks from Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic

first_imgThe polar desert is one of the most extreme environments on Earth. Endolithic organisms can escape or mitigate the hazards of the polar desert by using the resources available in the interior of rocks. We examined endolithic communities within crystalline rocks that have undergone shock metamorphism as a result of an asteroid or comet impact. Specifically, we present a characterization of the heterotrophic endolithic community and its environment in the interior of impact-shocked gneisses and their host polymict breccia from the Haughton impact structure on Devon Island, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic. Microbiological colonization of impact-shocked rocks is facilitated by impact-induced fissures and cavities, which occur throughout the samples, the walls of which are lined with high abundances of biologically important elements owing to the partial volatilization of minerals within the rock during the impact. 27 heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from these shocked rocks and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The isolates from the shocked gneiss and the host breccia are similar to each other, and to other heterotrophic communities isolated from polar environments, suggesting that the interiors of the rocks are colonized by microorganisms from the surrounding country rocks and soils. Inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were used to identify the chemical composition of the shocked materials and to document the in situ growth of microbes in their interiors. The identification of these heterotrophic communities within impact-shocked crystalline rocks extends our knowledge of the habitable biosphere on Earth. The colonization of the interiors of these samples has astrobiological applications both for considering terrestrial, microbiological contamination of meteorites from the Antarctic ice sheet and for investigating possible habitats for microbial organisms on the early Earth, and more speculatively, on Mars and other planetary bodies.last_img read more

09
May
2021

How insects survive the cold: molecular mechanisms – a review

first_imgInsects vary considerably in their ability to survive low temperatures. The tractability of these organisms to experimentation has lead to considerable physiology-based work investigating both the variability between species and the actual mechanisms themselves. This has highlighted a range of strategies including freeze tolerance, freeze avoidance, protective dehydration and rapid cold hardening, which are often associated with the production of specific chemicals such as antifreezes and polyol cryoprotectants. But we are still far from identifying the critical elements behind over-wintering success and how some species can regularly survive temperatures below -20°C. Molecular biology is the most recent tool to be added to the insect physiologist’s armoury. With the public availability of the genome sequence of model insects such as Drosophila and the production of custom-made molecular resources, such as EST libraries and microarrays, we are now in a position to start dissecting the molecular mechanisms behind some of these well-characterised physiological responses. This review aims to provide a state of the art snapshot of the molecular work currently being conducted into insect cold tolerance and the very interesting preliminary results from such studies, which provide great promise for the future.last_img read more

09
May
2021

Penguin responses to climate change in the Southern Ocean

Penguins are adapted to live in extreme environments, but they can be highly sensitive to climate change, which disrupts penguin life history strategies when it alters the weather, oceanography and critical habitats. For example, in the southwest Atlantic, the distributional range of the ice-obligate emperor and Adélie penguins has shifted poleward and contracted, while the ice-intolerant gentoo and chinstrap penguins have expanded their range southward. In the Southern Ocean, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode are the main modes of climate variability that drive changes in the marine ecosystem, ultimately affecting penguins. The interaction between these modes is complex and changes over time, so that penguin responses to climate change are expected to vary accordingly, complicating our understanding of their future population processes. Penguins have long life spans, which slow microevolution, and which is unlikely to increase their tolerance to rapid warming. Therefore, in order that penguins may continue to exploit their transformed ecological niche and maintain their current distributional ranges, they must possess adequate phenotypic plasticity. However, past species-specific adaptations also constrain potential changes in phenology, and are unlikely to be adaptive for altered climatic conditions. Thus, the paleoecological record suggests that penguins are more likely to respond by dispersal rather than adaptation. Ecosystem changes are potentially most important at the borders of current geographic distributions, where penguins operate at the limits of their tolerance; species with low adaptability, particularly the ice-obligates, may therefore be more affected by their need to disperse in response to climate and may struggle to colonize new habitats. While future sea-ice contraction around Antarctica is likely to continue affecting the ice-obligate penguins, understanding the responses of the ice-intolerant penguins also depends on changes in climate mode periodicities and interactions, which to date remain difficult to reproduce in general circulation models. read more