Category: hmltkprr

26
Jan
2021

Bald, Beautiful

first_imgRoughly five months after she shaved her head for the St. Baldrick’s Day fundraiser, “The Bald and the Beautiful,” junior Elise Jordan said her morning routine is considerably shorter. “It’s growing in a lot nicer than I thought it would,” she said, running her fingers through her short hair. “I get to sleep in longer in the mornings, too, because I don’t have to mess with it.” Jordan was one of few girls to go bald last spring for the charity, which benefits childhood cancer research grants. She said she shaved her hair, which reached the middle of her back, for many reasons, but she has also learned things she could not have imagined. “There’s a lot of pressure placed on young girls and teenage girls. The last thing they should be worrying about if they have this terrible disease is looking pretty,” she said. “I hope I can just show at least one girl that you don’t need hair to be beautiful.” Jordan called her shaved head a “vanity check.” “The first six to eight weeks after I did it, I was concerned,” she said. “I kept asking, ‘Is it growing in fast enough?’” She said she met new people while on campus this summer, and they were all curious about her hair and the charity. A summer vacation at a family home in Vancouver, British Columbia, also proved interesting — many family friends asked her about her shortened hair. “People were really supportive. I’ve had a lot of positive feedback from people,” she said. “I’ve had guys say it looks better shorter.” Her hairstyle continues to make an impact; she still receives checks in the mail for donations for the charity. “People are intrigued by the entire event,” she said. “It’s a three-day event on campus, but it spans the entire year. We can still raise money.” She said she is unsure of how much money she raised personally, but she believes the event raised over $40,000 for the charity. “I don’t know how much I made,” she said. “I did online donations and have had extra money donated after. I don’t really care — it was all about how much we raised in total.” To anyone considering shaving their hair for the charity, she said it requires some thought. “Take your time,” she said. “It was very different. Some days I wanted my hair back. But it’s all about confidence. You’ve got to remember you did it for a good cause. It changed how I see myself.” She also cited her mom, a physician, as inspiration — or, more specifically, her mom’s patients. “She’s had tons of women come back in who went through chemo and were in remission with cancer again,” she said. “The first thing they say is they don’t want to do chemo again — they want to keep their hair.” While she’s uncertain if she’s going to grow her hair out or keep it short, Jordan said it’s a theoretical, and literal, weight off her shoulders. “It’s something so stupid. Why should your hair define you?” she said. “Some of my friends have long hair. I have short hair. There are a lot of things more important than a head of hair.”last_img read more

18
Jan
2021

Sharyn Rothstein’s By the Water Starts Previews Off-Broadway

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 7, 2013 The world premiere of Sharyn Rothstein’s By the Water begins performances at New York City Center—Stage II on November 4. The play, which is part of the Manhattan Theatre Club and Ars Nova’s commissioning partnership, The Writer’s Room, is directed by Hal Brooks. The limited engagement will open officially on November 18 and run through December 7. View Comments The cast includes Cassie Beck, Quincy Dunn-Baker, Charlotte Maier, Deirdre O’Connell, Tom Pelphrey, Ethan Phillips and Vyto Ruginis. Related Shows By the Water takes place after Hurricane Sandy has ravaged the lifelong home of Marty and Mary Murphy. The storm has ripped apart more than just the walls: with their neighbors too devastated to stay, the couple’s beloved Staten Island community is in danger of disappearing forever. Determined to rebuild, Marty wages a campaign to save his neighborhood and his home, but when the Murphys’ sons arrive to help their parents dig out, past betrayals come rushing to the surface. By the Waterlast_img read more

01
Jan
2021

NBT Bank formally opens Burlington office, first in Vermont

first_img# # # On March 10, NBT Bank held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to formally open its Burlington Office. This office, located at 150 Bank Street, is the bank s first retail branch in Vermont. The bank s Vermont regional office is located in the same building.On hand for the ceremony were NBT Bank executives and employees, local public officials, area business leaders and invited guests. NBT Bank Regional President Matt Durkee said: Establishing our presence in Vermont has been a great experience for us. People have been very responsive to our community banking approach, and we look forward to continued growth here.The accompanying photo of the ribbon cutting shows (from left): Martin Dietrich, president and chief executive officer of NBT Bank; Kelly Devine, executive director of the Burlington Business Association; Timothy Shea, vice president of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce; Dan Johnson, vice president and regional manager of NBT Bank s retail operations in Vermont; Bob Kiss, mayor of Burlington; Matt Durkee, regional president of NBT Bank s operations in Vermont; and Helen Pinan, mortgage originator for NBT Bank in Vermont.NBT Bank provides personal banking, asset management and business services. The independent community bank, based in Norwich, N.Y., has 85 offices in upstate New York. The bank recently expanded into Vermont by opening a regional office and retail branch in Burlington. NBT Bank s parent company, NBT Bancorp Inc., had assets of $5.5 billion as of December 31, 2009.Source: NBT. NORWICH, N.Y. (MARCH 12, 2010)last_img read more

30
Dec
2020

The Need for Speed: Lightweight Running Shoes

first_imgPrintThe spring race season is upon us. You may not be able to get back those winter days on the couch, but cutting gear weight is a cheap way to boost your times. Lace up one of these lightweight shoes for your next P.R.1. Mizuno Wave Rider 16The latest Wave Rider incarnation does not disappoint. Weighing in at a featherlight 9.9 ounces, the Wave Rider 16 still has plenty of support for ultra distance training and road racing. $115. mizunousa.com2. Pearl Izumi Syncro Fuel RD IIAlready known as a light, cushioned road runner, the latest version improves the fit with a seam-free interior and Ortholite sockliner, cutting down on blister potential. The 360-degree lacing system hugs the foot and Energy Foam provides the soft landing on hard surfaces.$125. pearlizumi.com 3. Merrell Mix Master 2The lightweight, cushioned trail shoe fits snugly like a foot glove. It features a 4mm heel-to-toe drop and an air mesh upper that sheds water quickly after creek crossings. For ultra training and racing on tough trails, the Mix Master is a top performer.$110. Merrell.com 4. Patagonia EVERmoreThe EVERmore is the best new trail shoe and the new favorite among our elite trail running wear-testers. Only 7.8 ounces, it’s one of the toughest trail shoes on the market. The shoe features a durable, breathable air mesh upper, drainage ports, an integrated 2mm footbed, and a tough tacky-rubber sole with climbing lugs in forefoot and rear-facing braking lugs in heel.$110. Patagonia.com5. Inov-8 Bare Grip 200Simply put, it’s the lightest, fastest trail shoe for notching a personal-best. The super-grippy lugs provide outstanding traction, while the minimalist lightweight upper is flexible, durable, and drains quickly.$110. inov-8.comlast_img read more

18
Dec
2020

Jericho Gas Station Clerk Shot Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 56-year-old man was found shot dead at a gas station in Jericho on Wednesday night, Nassau County police said.A customer walked into the BP Gas Station on Jericho Turnpike and found the clerk laying on the floor behind the counter shortly after 9 p.m., police said.The victim was found to have suffered a gunshot wound to the abdomen, police. He was pronounced dead at the scene.  His identity was not immediately released.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and have not determined the motive of the shooting.Detectives ask anyone with information regarding this crime to contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous.last_img read more

16
Dec
2020

Long Island Blizzard Dumps 30 Inches, Halts Travel

first_img At area airports, airlines were working on a reduced schedule after going a day with no flights at all. Long Island MacArthur Airport said flights were cancelled until late Sunday afternoon and advised travelers to check with airlines for updates. The above-ground power lines across Long Island appeared to hold up well through the storm. The number of people without power fluctuated all day Saturday, with PSEG Long Island reporting that it had restored service to more than 25,000 customers. The one death in Nassau was a 61-year-old West Hempstead man who suffered cardiac arrest while shoveling snow, Nassau County police said. He was taken to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Suffolk County police reported two blizzard-related deaths. A 75-year-old woman shoveling at her Tippen Drive home had difficulty breathing and was transported to Huntington Hospital, where she died, police said. In Smithtown, a 94-year-old man collapsed near his snow blower and was pronounced dead at St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center, police said. “I think it’s something we’re going to pay a lot more attention to,” Bellone said of getting the word out about elderly residents shoveling deep snow in the bitter cold. UPDATE: Authorities have identified a fourth blizzard-related death. A 66-year-old man was fatally struck by a snow plow in front of his Oyster Bay Cove home on Sunday, Nassau County police said.(Photo credit: New York Governor’s Office) Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York There was a period when it seemed this winter would be remembered not for Mother Nature’s fury but instead for sweaty 60-degree December days. Not anymore. The blizzard of 2016 lived up to the hype, spawning swirling and driving snow that caused whiteout conditions, prompting Gov. Andrew Cuomo to declare a state of emergency and issue a travel ban that was lifted at 7 a.m. Sunday, 15 hours after it had gone into effect. A blizzard warning that had been in effect since early Saturday also expired. “Traveling has resumed and has resumed without issue thus far,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at a Sunday morning press conference. When Mother Nature’s pent up fury finally got under control, nearly 30 inches had fallen on the Island. The Nor’easter also proved fatal. Three people apparently attempting to clear snow had died, a 61-year-old man in West Hempstead, a 94-year-old Smithtown man, and a 75-year-old woman from Huntington Station. Overall, there were 18 reported deaths from the blizzard, which slammed much of the mid-Atlantic. In Suffolk, County Executive Steve Bellone told the Press county and state roads are passable but secondary roads could take more of an effort to clear. Calling it an “extraordinary” storm, he said it could take a few days for crews to clear all the snow. Bellone did say the county “dodged” a bullet because there were no reports of significant flooding, which was a top concern among state and local officials. On Sunday morning residents awoke to mounds of snow along sidewalks and in driveways. There was the ubiquitous hum of snow blowers and sound of shovels colliding with pavement. Instead of drifting snow, LI was being bathed in a glorious blue sky, but despite the superb conditions it could take a few days for local municipalities to clean up the mess. The National Weather Service’s Upton office released unofficial snowfall totals that surpassed even upgraded predictions of up to two feet. Hicksville had the most significant snowfall with 29.6 inches. Other communities saw a little more than two feet, while others were lucky enough to record about a foot and a half. In Suffolk, the highest total reported by the weather service was 26.5 in Commack. The storm was so powerful that officials decided Saturday afternoon to suspend service on the Long Island Rail Road and institute a travel ban on the Long Island Expressway and Northern State Parkway. The travel ban has since been lifted. But officials at the LIRR said service would remain suspended with crews working through the day to make tracks passable and clear LIRR yards that remain buried under two feet of snow.“The problem we’re still having is the Long Island Rail Road, which sustained significant damage in the yards,” Cuomo told reporters. Crews, the railroad said, will focus on the most highly-traveled branches with the goal of returning service for the Monday morning commute. last_img read more

19
Oct
2020

Virus cost global tourism $460 billion in January-June: UN

first_imgThe coronavirus crisis cost the global tourism sector US$460 billion in lost revenue during the first six months of 2020 as the number of people traveling plunged, the United Nations said Tuesday.Revenue lost between January and June amounted to “around five times the loss in international tourism receipts recorded in 2009 amid the global economic and financial crisis,” the Madrid-based World Tourism Organization said in a statement.International tourist arrivals fell by 440 million during the period, or 65 percent, with Asia, the first region to feel the impact of Covid-19, seeing the steepest decline, it added. “This represents an unprecedented decrease, as countries around the world closed their borders and introduced travel restrictions in response to the pandemic,” the Tourism Organization said.While tourism is slowly returning to some destinations, the UN body warned that “reduced travel demand and consumer confidence” would continue to hurt the sector for the rest of the year.It predicted international tourist arrivals will plunge by around 70 percent in 2020 owing to the coronavirus.International tourism arrivals rose by four percent in 2019 to 1.5 billion, with France the world’s most visited country, followed by Spain and the United States.The last time international tourist arrivals posted an annual decline was in 2009 when the global economic crisis led to a four percent drop.The UN body said it expects it will take two to four years for tourist arrivals to return to 2019 levels.Topics :last_img read more

16
Oct
2020

Wolf Administration Announces Workers’ Comp Insurance Rate Cut, Further Lowering Cost of Doing Business in Pennsylvania

first_img Press Release Boyertown, PA –Wolf Administration cabinet secretaries for the Insurance Department and Labor & Industry today announced Pennsylvania businesses will see another cut in workers’ compensation insurance rates while maintaining benefit levels for injured workers.Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller and Labor & Industry Secretary Kathy Manderino made the announcement at an event at Global Advanced Metals in Boyertown.Workers’ comp insurance rates will drop 6.21 percent, effective April 1, reducing a key expense for many companies and saving Pennsylvania businesses an estimated $150 million this year.“This significant rate cut comes on top of reductions during my administration’s first two years, which improved our state’s standing across the nation for this cost of doing business,” said Governor Wolf. “Today’s reduction will further help business owners create jobs that pay in Pennsylvania and at the same time, maintain fair benefits for workers injured on the job, something that is vital for families’ financial well-being and peace of mind.”Today’s rate cut announcement comes following a national study released last November, showing Pennsylvania improved its standing among states in workers’ comp insurance costs under the Wolf Administration, dropping from 17th highest to 26th highest from 2014 to 2016.  The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services conducted the study comparing workers’ comp insurance rates for 50 selected employment classes based on methods that put states’ workers’ comp rates on a comparable basis with a constant set of state-specific risk classifications.Commissioner Miller said her department under Governor Wolf’s leadership is working to maintain a vibrant and competitive workers’ compensation insurance market, helping keep costs down.“More than 325 companies offer workers’ compensation insurance coverage in Pennsylvania,” Commissioner Miller said.  “This means employers are able to find attractive, cost-efficient options for this vital insurance.”The rate reduction follows the Insurance Department’s approval of the Pennsylvania Compensation Rating Bureau’s annual loss cost filing. These loss costs are used to determine the premiums businesses pay for workers’ compensation insurance. The premium savings for an individual employer will vary based on the employer’s risk classification, claims experience and other factors. Not all employers will see a decrease.This is the sixth consecutive workers’ compensation insurance cut in as many years, and brings the cumulative savings to $720 million for the past six years. Workers’ compensation insurance covers the cost of medical care and rehabilitation for injured workers, and lost wages and death benefits for the dependents of those killed in work-related accidents.The other important component of today’s announcement is that benefit levels have been maintained for injured workers.  Labor & Industry Secretary Manderino said certified workplace safety committees, overseen by her department, are key for both cost and safety.“Certified workplace safety committees help employers and workers keep safety top-of-mind at all times,” Secretary Manderino said.  “And those companies with a committee receive a five percent discount on their workers’ comp insurance premiums.”More than 11,220 state-certified workplace safety committees have been established since March 1994, protecting more than 1,463,000 workers. Additionally, employers with certified workplace safety committees have saved close to $604.2 million in workers’ compensation premiums. These savings in insurance costs are due solely to the five percent premium discount provided to businesses that have these committees.Global Advanced Metals has a long-standing certified workplace safety committee and won a Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence in 2016. Global is a leading manufacturer of high performance tantalum metallurgical and powder products to the electronics, aerospace, automotive, and chemical manufacturing industries.“Global Advanced Metals, Inc. is proud of our safety record, which is a reflection of the hard work and dedication of our workforce to our safety process.  This dedication to safety has been instrumental in our successful certification as an OSHA VPP Star site since 2008, as well as receiving the Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence,” said Mark Lackey, Boyertown Facility General Manager.  “We could not have achieved this level without the safety focus and effort from all of our employees and contractors.  It is great to see that our efforts and the efforts of many companies in Pennsylvania have contributed to real cost reductions for current and future businesses in PA.”Secretary Manderino added her department’s Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Health & Safety Division provides employers with the most up-to-date and relevant safety information and benefits possible for employees.  Employers should contact their insurance company or agent for more information about how their workers’ compensation premiums will be affected.More information on Pennsylvania insurance products is available at www.insurance.pa.gov.For more information on making Pennsylvania’s workplaces safer, visit www.dli.pa.gov, “Workers’ Compensation Services.” March 30, 2017 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Wolf Administration Announces Workers’ Comp Insurance Rate Cut, Further Lowering Cost of Doing Business in Pennsylvanialast_img read more

16
Oct
2020

Gov. Wolf: Electronic Prescribing of Controlled Substances Decreases Diversion, Fraud

first_imgGov. Wolf: Electronic Prescribing of Controlled Substances Decreases Diversion, Fraud October 28, 2019 Healthcare,  Press Release,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that health care providers prescribing controlled substances are required to do so electronically, unless they meet certain exceptions. This is set forth by Act 96, now in effect.“Electronic prescribing is a tremendous deterrent against prescription fraud and the latest effort of the state to decrease the effects of the opioid crisis in Pennsylvania,” Gov. Wolf said. “We have seen the number of opioid prescriptions decrease through education and other initiatives we have put in place. Electronic prescribing is a way to keep opioids out of the hands of those who may misuse them.”Recent data has shown that from 2016 through mid-2019, opioid prescribing is down 30 percent. In addition, the total number of patients who were prescribed high dosages of opioids decreased by 46 percent from mid-2016 through mid-2019. A high dosage is defined as a daily dose of opioids with a morphine-milligram equivalent greater than 90. Also, the total number of patients who were prescribed overlapping prescriptions of both benzodiazepines and opioids for more than 30 days decreased by 48 percent in the same time frame.“Electronic prescribing is the latest initiative to stop opioids and other controlled substances from getting into the wrong hands,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “This technology allows health care providers to send prescriptions directly to the pharmacy, streamlining the process of getting a controlled substance prescribed. Electronic prescribing will also help to cut down on medication mistakes, which can occur with written prescriptions.”For individuals who have questions about this new law and how it affects them, the Department of Health has a website with information for patients, prescribers and dispensers. In addition, anyone with questions can contact the department by emailing [email protected] or calling 844-377-7367 Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.The Opioid Command Center, established in January 2018 when Gov. Wolf signed the first opioid disaster declaration, meets every week to discuss the opioid crisis. The command center is staffed by personnel from 17 state agencies, spearheaded by the departments of Health and Drug and Alcohol Programs.Recent data shows that in 2018, more than 4,400 people died from a drug overdose. This represents an 18 percent decrease in drug overdose deaths from 2017.For more information about opioids and electronic prescribing, visit www.health.pa.gov.Find more information on the state’s response to the opioid crisis.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

28
Sep
2020

LTG Semonite Discusses Unique Dredging Capability of the Subdredge

first_img<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite, USACE Commanding General and 54th U.S. Army Chief of Engineers, discussed a unique dredging capability with Thad Pratt at U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory on Feb. 19, 2019.The new remote-operated Subdredge, which was built by EDDY Pump, was delivered to the Army Corps in late 2018.The Mini-Robotic Dredge’s capabilities were successfully tested for the first time on the ERDC campus in Vicksburg, Miss., Dec. 20, 2018.The MRD is being evaluated for its expeditionary dredging capability to support improved access to the shore and reduce deployment timelines during Anti-Access/Anti-Denial and Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief Operations.last_img read more