Category: lpohnagk

01
Mar
2021

Arresting images

first_imgIt might not seem that the live helicopter feed of Los Angeles police cruisers trailing O.J. Simpson’s white Bronco has much in common with the Sacco and Vanzetti murder trial. But a new exhibit at the Harvard Law School (HLS) Library shows that America’s appetite for tawdry and salacious crime reporting existed long before “Dateline NBC” ever did.“Extra! Extra! Read All About It: A Tale of True Crime” explores the exploitative history of crime and the American media, a relationship that began in the mid-1800s when a public fascination with true crime emerged, largely stemming from the popularization of serialized crime literature in the penny press. Curated by Lesley Schoenfeld, coordinator of public services and visual collections, the exhibit showcases this literature, published in both newspapers and books around the country, as well as the media’s depictions of three prominent historical crimes: Massachusetts’ child serial killer Jesse Pomeroy, the Lindbergh kidnapping, and the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti.“I knew I wanted to curate an exhibit on crime,” said Schoenfeld, who turned to the library’s historical and special collections to create the compact but compelling exhibit housed in two exhibit cases in the Library’s Caspersen Room. “I remembered this scholar who came to the library to research Sacco and Vanzetti last summer, and I contacted her to see if she would be willing to help out with the exhibit and expand on some of the research.”That scholar was Michele Fazio, an assistant professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, whose research was concerned with the media’s portrayal of family in the Sacco and Vanzetti case. The press’s fascination centered, unsurprisingly, on the breakup of the Sacco household. Photographs of Nicola Sacco’s wife, Rosina, and their children served as both a gut-wrenching reminder of crime’s repercussions and a manipulative means to sell newspapers.In one photograph, Rosina walks, head slightly bowed, out from the courthouse. That was the authentic version — but a second, doctored photo made its way out into the media frenzy. Captioned “the end of the road,” the composite image was meant to show Rosina leaving the Charlestown prison, presumably after an emotional visit with her husband.Other exhibit items include records from the Wood Detective Agency, New England’s first private detective firm, which follow proprietor and former Boston detective James R. Wood’s recollections of his dealings with Pomeroy. Juxtaposed with his own account are subsequent recountings of the crime from an 1892 book and a 1930s Boston newspaper.“When you work with such an amazing collection, it can be hard to know what to highlight,” said Schoenfeld. “Based on the response we have been getting, I think this is a topic that speaks to a lot of people’s interests, and I am really grateful for the opportunity it gave me to work with one of our researchers.”“True Crime” is on view through April 26.last_img read more

26
Jan
2021

Archaeology class travels to Ireland

first_imgExplore Celtic Iron Age ruins? Check. Examine six-thousand-year-old Neolithic agricultural land? Check. Survive a gale that suspended the ferry system? Check. Rain or shine, 12 Notre Dame students in the Archaeology of Ireland class ventured out each day during Fall Break to study the interdisciplinary facets of archaeology in coastal Ireland. Professor Ian Kuijt, who has taught the course for the past five years, said the trip offered students an experience of the country far more intensive than that available to casual visitors. “[There is] an adaptive, spontaneous aspect to it. You see sites off the beaten track, not ones you’d take a tourist bus to,” Kuijt said. “Most are in remote locations and [students] probably won’t ever see them again.” Kuijt planned this year’s trip in collaboration with Director of Irish Studies Chris Fox and received funding from Richard Sweetman, ’58. Kuijt, accompanied by John O’Neill, a professor at Ireland’s Carlow College, led students in exploring five to eight sites each day. Each student took charge of a site, preparing a tour with write-ups and maps. “When we went to the site, [the student site leader] had to wear a very attractive red safety vest and give a tour for 30 to 40 minutes. They were essentially in charge of that educational moment,” Kuijt said. “That person always got to go on the site first, because it was theirs.” Some of the sites included areas where Kuijt had done archeological surveys in the past, including Omey Island and Inisbofin. Kuijt and his students were prevented from visiting one of their planned sites by an intense gale that shut down the necessary ferry. Kuijt said the students dealt well with the severe weather conditions. “We went out in full rain gear but were getting sunburned on our faces and hands. It’s the roughest I’ve seen it in five years,” he said. “But they took great advantage of it in good spirits, which isn’t something all people can do.” Junior Ryan Lion said the opportunity to employ the skills and knowledge he learned in class made the trip worth the difficult weather and sparse sleep. “Archeology lets you contextualize a period. You can read about it and have it ingrained in you, but when you actually stand in the remains of a building from the sixth century, it really impacts you,” he said. “It was really active, involved learning.” Lion said he was drawn to the Portumna Workhouse site because of his interest in health. “It provided information on the health of Irish workhouses and the diseases affecting the people living in them at that time. People suffered from cholera and typhoid,” he said. “The infirmary was understaffed and even those few workers lacked a medical background.” Lion and his classmates wrote papers and constructed posters on the sites they visited. He said the students’ firsthand experiences of the sites will enrich their projects more than traditional research. “We’ll do a lot of secondary research for the papers and posters, including statistics and any reading relevant to the topic,” he said, “but primary observation is important for insight ­— we’re not just spitting out academic blurbs.” Once the posters are completed, Kuijt said they will be exhibited at Flanner Hall, where they will be judged by an Irish researcher. Beyond the expanded knowledge about Irish culture and archeology, Kuijt said the students will benefit from the development of communication and presentation skills required by the projects associated with the trip. “They get this local experience, a hidden Ireland with some zany instructors, but they get a whole range of transportable skills as well,” he said. “That’s what’s paying off.” Lion said the trip offered an understanding of the course’s subject beyond what he could learn from lectures or textbooks. “We got to think like archeologists rather than just reading about it,” he said. “I just loved having the chance to learn about the unique identity of Irish culture and how diverse it is within its own national boundary.”last_img read more

17
Jan
2021

Save water, save money

first_imgMany ornamental nursery growers test to see if their plants need water by sticking a finger in the soil to see if it’s dry. Or, they just water them whether they need it or not. University of Georgia horticulturists have found a better way, one that requires less water, less fertilizer, less money and fewer dirty fingers.Now they have the funds and collaborations to study more water-saving technologies. UGA is part of a national team that received a five-year $5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Specialty Crop Research Initiative Grant. The goal is to save water, increase efficiency and reduce the environmental impacts of ornamental plant production.To do that, they’re developing “the next generation of tools to precisely monitor plant water use, allow for better control of irrigation water applications, increase the efficiency of water and nutrient use by ornamental growers,” said UGA horticulturist Marc van Iersel.Water moisture sensorsUGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty will use $520,000 of the grant to study affordable soil moisture sensors that can be used easily in greenhouses and nurseries. Van Iersel has been working with sensors for six years. He’s shown that they work in his greenhouse and at test nurseries. And now he can make them feasible for growers. He, along with UGA professors John Ruter, Matthew Chappell and Paul Thomas, will work in their greenhouses, nurseries and at test sites at Evergreen Nursery in Statham, Ga., and McCorkle Nurseries in Dearing, Ga.McCorkle saw the impact of using soil moisture sensors in a study UGA did last year.“They were watering the plants using normal practices, and we were using soil moisture sensors to irrigate the plants,” van Iersel said. “We reduced water use by 83 percent. “There’s definitely the potential for drastic water savings. How much probably depends on a particular greenhouse or nursery, but throughout the U.S., it has the potential to save huge amounts of water,” he said.Plant modelsUGA faculty will also study the water needs of different plants, such as petunia, poinsettia, hibiscus and hydrangea. Cooperators from other institutions will then develop software that will predict how much water these plants use. Growers will be able to enter information like plant type and age, greenhouse light levels and temperatures to tailor the software. They will be able to estimate how much water they will need for their plants.“Hydrangeas will definitely be one of the plants,” van Iersel said, “because that is such an important crop, and it’s a plant that seems to need a lot of water. Growers have trouble keeping hydrangeas well-watered, and they’re often over-watered.”Group effortJohn Lea-Cox from the University of Maryland is leading the overall project, which includes engineers, plant scientists, economists and Extension specialists. In addition to determining water needs, they will construct watering systems that greenhouse managers can use, understand and install themselves. By combining their expertise, this group aims to develop a commercially-available, affordable product within the next five years.Other universities and research centers on the grant are Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute, Colorado State University, Cornell University and the UM Center for Environmental Science. Commercial partners are Decagon Devices in Pullman, Wash., and Antir Software in Jarrettsville, Md. The grant will be combined with an additional $5.2 million in matching funding from various sources.Economists will look at whether the system is effective and economical for growers, van Iersel said. The questions they hope to answer are how much water, fertilizer and labor are saved, is there less runoff, less water to treat? And how about labor savings?Environmental impactVan Iersel sees the project as more than just a way for the plant industry to save money by reducing water and fertilizer. “It can be a way to decrease their environmental impact,” he said. “And that would benefit society at large.“If we reduce water use in these greenhouses and nurseries by X number of gallons per year, what is that value to society? If we can reduce runoff from greenhouses and nurseries, how much money is society saving by not having to clean up that water?”For more details of the project goals, the university teams and the commercial partners, visit www.smart-farms.net.last_img read more

19
Oct
2020

Seven victims of oil tanker fire in North Sumatra identified

first_imgThe North Sumatra Police identified on Tuesday night seven crew members of crude oil tanker Jag Leela at Belawan Port in Medan, North Sumatra, who were killed in a fire on Monday.The police’s Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) team identified the victims as Iman Maulana, 23; M. Nur Kasim Siregar, 37; Bahtiar Asmawi Siregar, 28; Iswondo, 46; Buchari, 34; Iwan Setiawan Hasibuan, 32; and Sandi Nova, 24. Five were residents of Medan, while the remaining two, who are siblings, are residents of Deli Serdang regency. The victims’ bodies have been released to their respective families for burial.“We will solve the case,” North Sumatra Police chief Insp. Gen Martuani Somin vowed on Tuesday while expressing his condolences to the victims’ families at Bhayangkara Hospital.“We are investigating 12 people in relation to the firs.”He added that the police’s forensic team was still unable to investigate the scene as the temperature inside the tanker ship was still unsafe.An explosion inside the crude oil tanker Jag Leela occurred on Monday at 8.30 a.m. when the ship was about to dock at the PT Waruna Nusa Sentana shipyard in the Belawan Port.The oil stored in the ship’s cargo made it difficult for local authorities to put out the fire, which was finally extinguished at 3 p.m. or around seven hours after the first explosion. Twenty-two crew members were injured and have been receiving medical treatment at Prima Cipta Husada Hospital and the Navy hospital.The police are currently looking for more casualties as some crew members might still be trapped inside the tanker’s hull. (trn)Topics :last_img read more

18
Oct
2020

Ian Wright urges Unai Emery to start Nicolas Pepe, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Alexandre Lacazette for Arsenal’s clash with Liverpool

first_imgUnai Emery could change his starting XI ahead of Arsenal’s clash with Liverpool (Getty Images)Ian Wright believes it is ‘vitally important’ that Unai Emery starts Nicolas Pepe, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Alexandre Lacazette together for Arsenal’s clash against Liverpool.Jurgen Klopp’s side and the Gunners have both won their two opening Premier League games ahead of their match at Anfield on Saturday evening.Aubameyang has scored in both matches, while Lacazette opened the scoring in the 2-1 victory over Burnley last weekend.Pepe, meanwhile, is yet to be handed his first start since his £72 million move to Arsenal in the summer.ADVERTISEMENTBut Wright feels the match against Liverpool is the right time to deploy Pepe from the start in order to exploit the gaps left by Trent Alexander-Arnold and Andy Robertson. Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 24 Aug 2019 3:13 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link18Shares Advertisement Comment Nicolas Pepe is looking for his first start for Arsenal (Getty Images)‘I think Arsenal now should know that Liverpool, they came out fast,’ Wright said on The Kelly & Wrighty show.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘They come out fast, for some reason against Arsenal they come out even faster. Arsenal have got to be ready for that.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘I think that the midfield, in respect of our midfield now, there’s players in there that I feel are more comfortable on the ball.‘This is why it’s vitally important that Pepe starts and Aubameyang and Lacazette because if we can then win the ball from Liverpool, who are finding their feet, we might be able to get into the spaces that Trent Alexander-Arnold may leave, what [Andy] Robertson might leave.‘Then all of a sudden you’re giving Liverpool a whole different problem, especially if they’re playing as high as they’ve been playing recently.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Ian Wright urges Unai Emery to start Nicolas Pepe, Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Alexandre Lacazette for Arsenal’s clash with Liverpoollast_img read more

29
Sep
2020

ECB interest rate cut tantamount to ‘expropriation’, says German association

first_imgHe argued that the consequences of the “politically set” low-interest-rate environment that had been in place for several years now “would be disastrous”.“With its policy, the ECB is conveying that there is no added value in supplementary pension saving,” he said.Another problem he sees is the postponement of pressing reforms and adjustments while the low base rate is “mainly used to refinance unprofitable or even non-performing loans” and to avoid “valuation corrections at all costs”.He said this inertia regarding reforms would serve as a second blow for future pensioners.In recent months, Rainer Jakubowski, Aden’s colleague on the BVV board, has issued similar warnings that German pension funds would run into trouble achieving minimum guarantees if interest rates remained low for much longer. He argued that institutions were being “punished” by the ECB for investing in most asset classes returning 3-4%, which is roughly the guarantee level.  The VFPK currently represents more than 4,200 company pension funds in Germany. The European Central Bank’s (ECB) recent decision to lower its benchmark interest rate from 0.25% to 0.15% has been “tantamount to expropriation from private households and savers”, according to the VFPK, Germany’s association of company pension funds.Helmut Aden, chairman at the VFPK, lamented that people “did not have a chance to accrue assets for their pension provision” and claimed this had been by “political design”. He called on the ECB and politicians to “end the hunt for record low interest as soon as possible” and stop moving “in the wrong direction”.According to Aden – who is also a board member of Germany’s largest Pensionskasse, the BVV – the ECB’s low interest rate policy will have “dramatic consequences for millions of future German pensioners”.last_img read more

28
Sep
2020

Gold Coast real estate: From ‘ramshackle’ to modern mansion

first_img8 Maxime Court, Isle of Capri. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:54Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: To sell or to renovate?00:55 8 Maxime Court, Isle of Capri.“You’re in the midst of it all but you’d never know it.”The house has four ensuited bedrooms, a cinema, library, kitchen with butler’s pantry.Concrete, timber, copper, stone and marble finishes are incorporated across the residence as well as many imported fixtures and fittings.“We introduced these features to give it soul,” she said.“But we also purposely chose neutral interiors for when new owners came in, so they could add their splashes of personality.”The property is on the market at $2.995 million through Kollosche Prestige Agents. 8 Maxime Court, Isle of Capri. 8 Maxime Court, Isle of Capri. “Or we can sit by the boardwalk and watch the pods of dolphins at play.”The real standout is the outdoor pavilion made from reclaimed railway bridge timber posts, a boardwalk constructed from original timber from Brisbane’s Bretts Wharf and a pool.“It’s a hidden gem on the Gold Coast,” she said. 8 Maxime Court, Isle of Capri.It embraced their main wish to create a home where people gather and build happy memories.“Our biggest hope was having a space which brought people together,” Ms Domrow said.“Whatever the mood you are in, there is an area for you to enjoy. “If you fancy a drink, you might escape to the pavilion, or for a chat we’ll congregate on the deck or lounge.“If we want to take in the fireworks and enjoy the best of the Gold Coast skyline views, we’ll head up to the third-floor bar and terrace. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoMORE: Fisherman’s hut going under the hammer MORE: Why this house is the most viewed in Queensland 8 Maxime Court, Isle of Capri.BUY the worst house on the best street.It’s the age-old property saying that’s paid off for Karyn and Roger Domrow, who bought their Isle of Capri property with big plans in mind. “It was previously quite a ramshackle lot but had so much potential,” Ms Domrow said. “People would look at it and think this was a project which would be just too hard.”The pair worked with Stuart Osman Building Designs to rebuild the waterfront house and by April 2015, it resembled a modern mansion with an oriental flavour.last_img read more

27
Sep
2020

US lawmaker seeks to ban foetuses in food

first_imgAFP 27 January 2012An Oklahoma lawmaker has proposed legislation to ban any use of foetuses in food in one of the more bizarre twists in the emotive US battle over abortion. The bill comes after wild rumors began circulating online and among anti-abortion groups that soft drink giant, Pepsi, was using aborted foetuses in its products. The company has denounced the urban legend as completely false. “PepsiCo does not conduct or fund research that utilises any human tissue or cell lines derived from embryos,” spokesman Peter Land told AFP. The rumours were originally triggered by a patent application by a Pepsi supplier which cited the use of the HEK293 cell line in developing processes for an artificial taste-tester. Originally derived from the kidneys of an aborted foetus in the 1970s, HEK293 is an easy-to-clone line of cells widely used in biotech research. Oklahoma state senator Ralph Shortey said he has been researching the issue for about a year and is concerned there are no rules preventing the use of embryonic stem cells or fetal tissue in food and other products. He introduced the bill in order to raise public awareness and preventing companies from engaging in any such “immoral” practices in his central plains state. “It’s not like I think companies are chopping up foetuses and using them as ingredients in food,” Shortey said in a telephone interview. But Shortey alleged the patent is proof that the supplier – Senomyx – has crossed a moral line by using “kidneys from aborted foetuses” as “taste receptors” to see how the cells respond to different artificial flavoring. “How ethical is it to use what I consider a destroyed human life to make food taste better,” he said.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10781597last_img read more

26
Sep
2020

DASPA Manager calls for a planned approach towards occupational health and safety

first_img 42 Views   no discussions LocalNews DASPA Manager calls for a planned approach towards occupational health and safety by: – August 24, 2011 Share Share Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Tweet General Manager of the Dominica Air & Sea Ports Authority, Mr. Benoit Bardouille. Photo credit: GIS NewsGeneral Manager of the Dominica Air and Sea Port Authority Bennoit Bardouille says there must be a planned approach towards occupational health and safety in any business.He was addressing a two day workshop on Occupational Safety and Health currently underway at the Public Service Training Centre.Bardouille says every business has a legal responsibility to provide safe and healthy conditions for its employees, customers, suppliers and anyone else that could be affected by its business activity.“Irrespective of the size of business that you do have, the issue of safety becomes an issue for every business. Many times we look after it has happened to take corrective action. Given the legal challenges of today it is better to deal with occupational safety issues before it becomes a problem,” he said.He says a business can improve its reputation as a result of its health and safety practices.The two day workshop is being facilitated by International Labor Organization representative Trinidadian Robert Teelicksingh.He says employers must ensure that they provide initiative for a decent workplace for its staff.The workshop is organised by the Dominica Employers Federation in collaboration with the International Labour Organisation.Other topics to be discussed HIV/AIDS and common workplace hazards.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

26
Sep
2020

Kalinago Territory to benefit from tree planting initiative

first_img Tweet Share Image via: treesonearth.comTo raise a greater awareness of the importance of sustaining the ecological systems and increasing biological diversity within the Kalinago Territory, a tree-planting ceremony is expected to take place in the Kalinago Territory.The event will take place on the grounds of the Salybia Primary School under the theme “Sustainability Through Bio-diversity”. Forestry Officer and Public Relations Officer of the Castle Bruce Coalition of District Officers Mr. Miguel Shillingford says the primary, long-term, objective of the ceremony is to encourage the participation of the Kalinago communities in planting a wide variety of endemic forest and fruit trees. “This is to increase the health of the natural environment as a rival to factors influencing climate change, global warming, habitat fragmentation, and plant and wildlife extinction,” he explained.Environment Minister Kenneth Darroux, Parliamentary Representative for the Kalinago Territory and the Kalinago Chief Garnet Joseph are among those who will attend the ceremony carded for November 10th, 2011.Dominica Vibes News 34 Views   no discussions LocalNews Kalinago Territory to benefit from tree planting initiative by: – October 26, 2011center_img Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more