Category: qxulxejw

02
Mar
2021

Oteil Burbridge Sings Lead For “China Doll” During Dead & Co’s Shoreline Run Opener [Video/Full Show Audio]

first_imgDead & Co | Shoreline Shoreline Amphitheatre | Mountain View, CA | 6/3/2017 | Photo: Matthew Rea Load remaining images Dead & Company are fresh into their summer tour, which kicked off over Memorial Day Weekend. This past weekend saw the Grateful Dead act hit the Hollywood Bowl for two nights before the first of two performances at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California, last night. Perhaps, the stand-out moment of the two-set performance was “China Doll,” which was used as a vehicle to finally let Oteil Burbridge sing. The Allman Brothers / Aquarium Rescue Unit bassist had previously hinted that he would sing lead this summer. However, to the delight of fans, that moment came sooner than expected at the start of Dead & Co’s second set following in the classic opening pairing of “China Cat Sunflower” into “I Know You Rider.” Burbridge’s stellar vocal debut with the ensemble is doubly impressive when considering it was a particularly difficult day for the musician, as his fellow band mate Gregg Allman was laid to rest across the country Macon, Georgia, a few hours earlier.Dead & Company Takes Hollywood Bowl On A “Dark Star” Space Voyage For The Ages [Video/Full Audio]Watch Oteil Burbridge sing lead on “China Doll,” courtesy of NalaThaBoxerOutside of the highly anticipated vocal debut of Burbridge, other highlights of Dead & Co’s performance that evening included the ever-popular “Viola Lee Blues,” which was lead in by show opener “Playin’ In The Band” with a particularly psychedelic jam through. “One More Saturday Night” closed out the first set, and though its position was uncharacteristic (the song has traditionally found itself used as a show opener, second set closer, or encore), the group’s performance of the night-appropriate song was a spirited way to end the first set. For the second set, standout moments included the seventeen-minute “Eyes of the World,” “The Wheel” which built out of “Drums” and “Space,” and the final number of the set, “Good Lovin’,” which the group noted on Instagram was originally supposed to be “Turn On Your Love Light.” You can check out videos and hear the full audio of the show below, as well as check out a photo gallery from last night, courtesy of Matthew Rea.[Photo: Erik Kabik]Setlist: Dead & Co | Shoreline Amphitheatre | Mountain View, CA | 6/4/17I: Playin’ in the Band, Viola Lee Blues, Tennessee Jed, Here Comes Sunshine, Candyman, Me and My Uncle, Friend of the Devil, One More Saturday NightII: China Cat Sunflower, I Know You Rider, China Doll, Eyes of the World, Deal, Drums, Space, The Wheel, Looks Like Rain, Good Lovin’E: Black Muddy RiverFirst Set Opener, “Playing In The Band”Second Set Opener, “China Cat Sunflower” > “I Know You Rider”Listen to the full show audio, courtesy of Jeff Frank:last_img read more

02
Mar
2021

Ghost Light Announces Phish NYE Run Late-Night

first_imgGhost Light has announced a special post-Phish late-night show in New York City. The band–featuring electrifying Joe Russo’s Almost Dead and American Babies guitarist Tom Hamilton, incomparable pianist and keyboard player Holly Bowling, former Dopapod drummer Scotty Zwang, American Babies guitarist and vocalist Raina Mullen, and Nico’s Gun bassist Steve Lyons–will play at the relatively new Times Square venue Sony Hall following Phish’s performance at Madison Square Garden on Sunday, December 30th.Following a monumental first year as a band that saw them play major festivals like The Peach Music Festival, High Sierra, and LOCKN’, in addition to a slew of sold-out club shows across the country, Ghost Light will return to New York City for their third and final performance of 2018 for this special late-night performance.Ghost Light Shares Full-Show Audio From Recent Debut-Heavy Burlington Show [Listen]With their next-level improvisations, their stellar catalog of original material and their tasteful selection of covers ranging from artists such as Bob Dylan, Radiohead, and beyond, Ghost Light’s impressive on-stage presence has quickly made them one of the most exciting new bands on the live circuit. The musicianship and connectivity displayed on stage are palpable, and it leads to an exciting result that most young bands can only dream of realizing.The exciting quintet will end their impressive first year with previously-announced appearances at Holidaze, Phil Lesh‘s Deadhead paradise Terrapin Crossroads, The Fillmore Philadelphia in a coveted support slot for The Disco Biscuits, and now, a high-profile Phish late-night show in New York City.Sony Hall is a new, top-flight music venue in Times Square, located on West 46th Street, that was opened by Blue Note Entertainment Group and Sony back in April. The venue is the former home of The Diamond Horseshoe, a historic vaudeville-era venue and nightclub dating back to 1938, and the classic art deco designs of the venue have mostly been kept intact by the new owners.Sony Hall is outfitted with Sony gear, with a multi-dimensional audio technology integrated within the venue to create a “spatial audio experience”, essentially an elevated level of surround sound audio which is created by approximately thirty speakers that line the room. Sony Hall is primed to become a major venue in the New York City market, and will certainly be a trusted location for late night shows for years to come due to its proximity to Madison Square Garden.Tickets for Ghost Light at Sony Hall are on sale NOW at this link. See below for full information on this show.[Art by Kellin Townsend [email protected]]Date: Sunday, December 30th, 2018 (technically early AM December 31st)Artist: Live For Live Music Presents: A Post-Phish Late Night Show With GHOST LIGHTVenue: Sony Hall – 235 W 46th St, New York, NY 10036Tickets: $20 Advance / $25 Day Of Show / $55 VIP (VIP includes elevated reserved seating with waitress service for food & beverage)Time: Doors 11:30 PM / Show 12:00 AMlast_img read more

01
Mar
2021

Why America can’t escape its racist roots

first_imgGAZETTE:  How can the country move forward in overcoming the racial divide?PATTERSON:  The immediate issue we’re dealing with right now is police brutality. There will have to be profound rethinking about the organization of police departments around the country. It’s not just a matter of appointing Black police chiefs, because there’s no evidence that that makes a damn difference. Because usually what happens is that they bend over backwards to prove to the majority of the white policemen that they’re being good cops, and the last thing they want is to open themselves up to the charge of reverse racism. What’s needed is a complete rethinking of police culture and the tendency to see the communities they are serving as the enemy. That’s the most immediate thing because police brutality is becoming epidemic. If something isn’t done, as soon as the demonstrations are over, they will quietly go back to doing what they always do.We also need to address the incarceration rates. I strongly supported [President Barack] Obama, but I don’t think he did enough on that issue. We need to continue reducing the size of the prison population. And we need to take a radical attitude towards de-ghettoization. I prefer to say de-ghettoization rather than integration because we have to get people out of the ghettos, or the inner cities — because not only do the ghettos segregate Blacks from the social and cultural capital of middle-class America, they also make residents easy targets for the police who see the ghettos as the enemy. De-ghettoization is different from integration, although I am in favor of integration, but it does mean Blacks need to get out from these concentrated areas of poverty and move into the broader community.And lastly, there needs to be a reckoning with the nation’s legacy of slavery and white supremacy, which is grounded in slavery. I spent my whole life studying slavery.I don’t think slavery was strictly abolished in 1865. What was abolished in 1865 was the personal individual enslavement of one person by another, but what persisted was the culture of slavery, and central to this culture was the sense that the white population felt it was their duty to control and suppress Black freedom. They did this in various ways, through the lynch mob, but also by the use of incarceration, during the neo-slavery system of Jim Crow.During Jim Crow, what persisted was the attitude to see Blacks as outsiders, as people to be punished, to be held in control, to be denied basic privileges of citizenship or ownership of land and to be recklessly imprisoned. In that sense, slavery was not really abolished in America until the 1960s, when the Jim Crow system was finally and fundamentally dismantled. So of course we need a lot of education in our schools about that and what the consequences were for Blacks, as well as for whites. It’s important that people learn that.This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and length. Lawrence D. Bobo dissects police killings of Black men and the history and cognitive forces behind racial bigotry and violence, and why he sees signs of hope The fire this time Relatedcenter_img The killing of George Floyd, who died after a white Minneapolis police officer kneeled into his neck for nearly nine minutes during an arrest, has spurred a wave of rage, anguish, and protests across the country. To better understand what is happening and what the future may hold, the Gazette talked with Orlando Patterson, the John Cowles Professor of Sociology. A scholar of slavery and issues of race, Patterson talked about the legacy of white supremacist ideology, racism in policing, and the ongoing, widespread discrimination and segregation in American life. He also explained why he hopes that the country can yet heal its racial divide, and sees particular promise in the young.Q&AOrlando PattersonGAZETTE:  Two years ago, you spoke to the Gazette on the 50th anniversary of the Kerner Report, which blamed white society’s racism as the underlying cause of the race riots of 1967. You said then that maybe we needed another report that looks at the roots of the racial inequities in the country. What is your take now?PATTERSON:  Reports are always useful if well done. There are now many studies of race and inequality, in fact it’s a virtual industry. There’s no shortage of thorough and well-informed research. But it would do no harm to have a group of people bring together the main results of the findings of recent studies, as well, including the views of influential people, not just academics, but also community, political, and religious leaders, who can say where they think we are and where we are going in terms of race relations in America. That’d be important especially now, after the killing of George Floyd. Many people must be asking themselves what has happened over the past half a century or more, since those first set of defining riots of the ’60s, not to mention the Rodney King riots in 1992. Is the element of white supremacy and chronic racism so deeply rooted that no amount of not just protests, but reform and institutional change is going to make a difference? That’s a depressing view. My sense is that there’s something new in these demonstrations.GAZETTE:  What is new about these protests, compared to the protests of 1967, 1968, or 1992, or the more recent ones organized by the Black Lives Matter movement?PATTERSON:  For one thing, and this is even true of the Rodney King demonstrations in 1992, the difference is the composition of the demonstrators. One cannot help but be struck by the significant proportion of the protesters who are white, Hispanic, and Asian. It was interesting, for example, that when the police brutally broke up a demonstration near the White House and trapped protesters on a road, a South Asian man took 70 of them in his house. My sentiment is that this is a more diverse, although still predominantly Black, expression of outrage. I think it has to do with the moment we’re living right now. People seemed horrified that we’re seeing this sort of thing after all these years, but they also sense that something is profoundly wrong. What’s terrifying about this moment is that the foundational institutions of our democracy are under assault, that the fundamental norms upon which our Constitution and our system of government rests are being threatened.GAZETTE:  What similarities do you find between previous protests, including the ones that followed the Rodney King beating, and the ones led by the Black Lives Matter movement, and the current protests?PATTERSON:  The common denominator is police violence and brutality. We have these brutal acts and killings, and we have outrage, protests, commissions, recommendations, and again and again, the police still continue in their old ways. They don’t seek to respect life and are prepared to brutalize someone for something as minor as passing a counterfeit $20 bill or jaywalking. The police are also very much part of one of the worst recent developments in American life: mass incarceration. It’s historically unprecedented, and it’s shameful that the country that claims to be the leader of the free world, although most of the rest of the world will consider that a joke, has the world’s highest number of people in prison: 2.3 million. And over 40 percent of those in prison are Black. This is really just astonishing, and the police have a lot to do with it, as well as prosecutors.GAZETTE:  There have been other cases of police brutality in the past few years, but why do you think the killing of George Floyd has led to this wave of protests even beyond the United States? Why did it happen now and not before?PATTERSON:  First, the whole thing was captured on video. And it was especially chilling because of the nonchalance, the sense of complete indifference, the disdain for someone’s life that the police officer showed as he killed Floyd. We have seen videos of brutality in the past, but this one came right after a series of police killings, and it simply reached the breaking point. When I saw the expression in that officer’s face and that three other officers were around him standing by as if this was just business as usual, I thought of Hannah Arendt and her phrase “the banality of evil.” What Arendt found most horrific was that ordinary people were able to commit horrible killings, and at the end of the day, they went back home to their nice homes and their nice families, and the next day they went back and killed again. I also think that the video came up in the midst of a pandemic, when people were feeling appalled at the incompetence and absence of leadership.GAZETTE:  What role might the pandemic have played in this wave of unrest?PATTERSON:  When we passed that critical milestone of 100,000 deaths, that called for a leader to express our collective fear and anxiety. We didn’t get that. People were really aghast at what was happening and at the reports that say that thousands of lives could have been spared if our leadership would have been more competent and less self-absorbed and concerned solely with the problem of reelection. The nation saw two big failures coming together: on the one hand, the absence of a proper health system and, on the other hand, the incompetent leadership. When the issue of police brutality came up with this video, people saw a link between the incompetent leadership, the failure of the American welfare state, and the resurgence of one of the worst aspects of American society: its white supremacist and racist ideology.GAZETTE:  How does white supremacy fit into this?PATTERSON:  What the killing has done is to show us that there still persists a hardcore white supremacy racist ideology, which rejects outsiders, anyone who is not white. That ideology is now ascendant as a result of the leadership in the White House. What I see is two great traditions in America that are competing. There is the liberal tradition, and there’s the equally dominant tradition of white supremacy, which comes out of the South but traveled northward. There is real tension between them.I’ve argued in my writings that there has been extraordinary progress in the changing attitudes of white Americans toward Blacks and other minorities. As late as the early ’60s, a majority of whites openly said they saw Blacks as inferior, and now there is an acceptance of equality, at least in their views. I’ve always said that this may be the great majority, but there’s still 20, 25 percent of whites who still embrace white supremacist views. This hard core of white supremacists is still there and have been encouraged and are leading a revanchist sort of movement. And that’s quite frightening.,GAZETTE:  To those who are not white supremacists but may be just be awakening to racial disparities in the nation, what would you like them to know about issues of race in the United States?PATTERSON:  I don’t want to use the term “white people” in general terms because as I said before, what is special about these recent protests is the participation of whites in it, many of them young. But I also see middle-aged and some people my age. I want to emphasize that I think white Americans have gone through quite radical changes in their attitudes, and that we’re talking about a more likely 25 percent of Americans who are hardcore racist, but I think most Americans have quite decent views about race.But sociologists have argued that while some whites may have liberal views, a lot of them are not prepared to make the concessions that are important for the improvement of Black lives. For example, one of the reasons why people have been crowded in ghettos is the fact that housing is so expensive in the suburbs, and one reason for that is that bylaws restrict the building of multi-occupancy housing. These bylaws have been very effective in keeping out moderate-income housing from the suburbs, and that has kept out working people, among whom Blacks are disproportionate, from moving there and having access to good schools. Sociologists have claimed that while we do have genuine improvement in racial attitudes, what we don’t have is the willingness for white liberals to put their money where their mouth is.One of the fundamental aspects of the American race problem is segregation. The Black population is almost as segregated now as it was in the ’60s. That is the foundation of a lot of problems that Blacks face, but it also explains and perpetuates the isolation of whites who grow up in neighborhoods where they don’t see Blacks or interact with them. That reinforces the idea that Blacks are outsiders and don’t belong.GAZETTE:  What don’t many white people understand about the life and experiences of people of color in this country?PATTERSON:  Some do; some don’t. I see definitely a change in the younger generation. It’s not just a matter of attitudes. In many ways, young white people are probably the least racist among whites. They are more racially tolerant.I’ve seen encouraging signs of this. I used to live on Trowbridge Street in Cambridge, and I enjoyed walking through the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. I was always struck by the easy interaction between white kids and Black kids, which was very different from the 1960s or the 1970s. It shows you what’s possible with a more integrated setting. Now you do have that in many areas, but not enough. In most cases, what you have is largely segregated schools. It’s obvious that if you don’t grow up with Black or white people, you don’t know how to interact with them or how to establish friendships with them. A lot of Black people complain about the awkwardness of interacting with whites who grew up with little contact with Blacks. That’s why I strongly emphasize the need to get rid of ghettos and segregation. It’s beneficial for everybody to have a diverse community in which people are still engaged primarily with their own community, but at least they interact with others. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

08
Feb
2021

Biden revokes terrorist designation for Yemen’s Houthis

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s administration is moving to revoke the designation of Yemen’s Houthis as a terrorist group, citing the need to mitigate one of the world’s worst humanitarian disasters. President Donald Trump’s administration had branded the Iranian-backed Houthis as a foreign terrorist organization, a move that limited the provision of aid to the beleaguered Yemeni people, who have suffered under a yearslong civil war and famine. A State Department official confirmed the move Friday after members of Congress were notified of the administration’s plans. The official said the removal changed nothing about the Biden administration’s views of the Houthis, who have targeted civilians and kidnapped Americans.last_img read more

26
Jan
2021

Saint Mary’s facilitates letter-writing project to Pope Francis

first_imgPhoto courtesy of L’Osservatore Romano Saint Mary’s College President, Carol Ann Mooney (left), and senior Kristen Millar shake hands with Pope Francis as they deliver the 225 letters from Catholic women across the United States on Nov. 26.Elizabeth Groppe, director of the CFS, said the group of women were inspired by Pope Francis’s call to Catholic youth to contribute to the Church’s life and mission. This call to action comes at a time when an estimated 35 percent of millennial women (born between 1981 and 1995) who were baptized Catholic have turned away from the Church and no longer practice their faith.In August 2014, the “Voices of Young Catholic Women” project was underway, Groppe said. The College extended a national invitation to young women to write to Pope Francis to more than 700 members of the Catholic Campus Ministry Association. The invitation was also extended to Saint Mary’s alumnae, Catholic parishes in the diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Catholic high schools with which Saint Mary’s has connections through the College’s recruiting network, team leaders of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS) and Catholic web media.The ProjectFollowing the national invitation, the project’s team compiled the letters, poems and other forms of creative expression into a binder for Pope Francis as they were sent to the College, Groppe said.The responses addressed four main questions, including: what is cherished about the Catholic tradition, what it is like to be a young woman today, how young women can contribute their gifts to serve the Church’s mission and what other ways young women can support one another’s return to the Church, if disconnected, Groppe said.College president Carol Ann Mooney said the project ties in with the Saint Mary’s mission “about as clearly as anything does.”“We are concerned at Saint Mary’s not simply with, of course, the academic and intellectual development of our students, but also their moral, social and spiritual development. That’s our philosophy,” Mooney said. “This project is not just about Saint Mary’s or our students, but it is more about our Church and how it can better reach out to young women and keep them close, well-served, sustained and nourished by the Church.”Kristen Millar, a senior and active participant in Campus Ministry, said she was first asked to help with the project last year, and agreed to help without any idea of what it would turn into.“As I met with [members of the CFS], we went over some of the articles that spurred this project — about Millennials leaving the Church and the problems young women face today — and it was shocking for me to discover all of this because I honestly didn’t know,” Millar said. “I felt as though I’ve been sheltered from the need that exists in the Church to re-inspire young women in their faiths.”One of the articles that prompted the project was America magazine’s 2012 article titled “A Lost Generation?” about fewer women in the United States practicing their faith, Groppe said.After reading the article, the group knew something needed to be done, Millar said.“At a time when many have left the Church, letters that give expression to the beauty, truth and goodness that young women do find in Catholicism can make an important contribution to the New Evangelization,” Groppe said. “Letters may also generate ideas about ways in which the Church could strengthen its support for young women amidst the many challenges they face to their baptismal holiness and human dignity, including epidemic levels of sexual violence and a media culture that degrades women. The intent of this project is constructive and hopeful.”The CFS received 225 letters, including several poems, some prayers and a number of drawings and works of art, Groppe said. Most notably, students at Saint Ursula Academy in Cincinnati designed a handmade pink and red satin stole for Pope Francis.Though most of the letters have been kept confidential, the letters expressed love for the Church and the Pope, but also included concerns about today’s secular culture, which often objectifies women, director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said.“Some writers shared private sorrows, like that of sexual assault,” O’Brien said. “Others recognized the problem and ideas on how to address it.”Delivering the Letters to Pope FrancisOver Thanksgiving break, Bishop Kevin Rhoades, of the Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Mooney, Millar and alumna Grace Urankar, (class of 2014) traveled to Rome to deliver the letters Nov. 26 at the weekly papal audience.Urankar said the weight of the project did not hit her until she literally found herself carrying the bag with the large binder containing the 225 letters through the metal detector at the Vatican.“To physically carry them reminded me of the old belief  ‘strength in numbers.’ It means so much to me that other young Catholic women appreciated our mission and united with us in letter writing,” Urankar said. “With so many voices represented, how could we not be heard?”After the papal audience, Rhoades introduced Millar and Mooney to Pope Francis in Spanish, and all were able to shake Pope Francis’ hand as they delivered the binder and stole.“I presented the stole from Saint Ursula’s, and then President Mooney gave Pope Francis the binder and said that the letters contained the joys, hopes, griefs and sorrows of young women from the millennial generation,” Millar said. “He shook both of our hands and said ‘Please pray for me, I need the prayers,’ which was incredibly moving and humbling to hear.“The very day before, Pope Francis was in France, and the next day he was leaving for Turkey, so it just shows you how much of an effort he is making to reach different communities and address different issues,” Millar said. “He’s a universal symbol for the universal Church, and we were honored to be able to present him with a national symbol — the letters.”Mooney said the experience of delivering the letters was wholly thrilling.“It’s not only thrilling to go to Rome, and it’s certainly thrilling to actually talk to the Pope, but it was truly thrilling to feel like we were there doing something that was really important,” Mooney said.Besides attending the papal audience and meeting Pope Francis, the group attended a Mass offered by Bishop Rhoades and had dinner with the students studying in the College’s Rome study abroad program, Millar said.The group also toured the Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel, led by Rome program professor Harula Economopoulos, and they visited the sites of historic Rome, such as the Colosseum and Pantheon.“One night at dinner, President Mooney, her husband, George, and Grace and I sat down and had a really good conversation about the project and the Pope and how we need to remember that the pope is human too,” Millar said. “A lot of times we think of him as a more distant figure, when in actuality he is going through the same trials of being a human like we are, and he has the same joys and hopes and fears.“When we saw him in the audience, he was so charismatic and gets so much joy out of being with the people. You can tell he wants to be in the community helping people and knowing people. He stays in the crowd as long as he can, even if he’s in his ‘Pope mobile.’“I am just grateful to be able to do my part in answering his call to young women,” Millar said.‘Together, we can do even more’With the letters delivered, the project’s team has since returned to the United States and hopes the idea behind the project will continue to be discussed in the Church and beyond, Millar said.One of the group’s more modest hopes, expressed by Mooney, Millar and Urankar, is simply for the letters to be read.“Some young women poured their hearts out in the pages of those letters, so what one hopes is not only that they are read — and I trust they will be — but that with the Holy Spirit, there’s some realization of unmet needs and how the Church can work to meet them,” Mooney said.Urankar said she believes Pope Francis will read and hold the letters’ intentions in his heart.“It is a challenging time and culture for us as young American Catholic women, but we are strong, committed and prepared to build the kingdom of God,” Urankar said. “I hope Pope Francis realizes this through our letters, and I hope anyone who has witnessed this project knows the same.”In regards to the project’s development, Mooney said she was impressed by the enthusiasm of the students and their courage to aim for the top from the very beginning.“Quite often, one loses that optimism and that belief that they have the ability to make change,” Mooney said. “We all need to keep that belief in ourselves alive. The optimism and enthusiasm that fueled this project is very important for everybody to keep.”The project will continue to manifest, Millar said, if women advocate for other women in our daily lives in all situations, as pressures build from society to remain faithful.“It’s important that women see their roles in the Church and within one another’s lives as vital and necessary, because they are,” Millar said. “I have had challenges in my faith and how to live it out, but ultimately I was able to make this trip because of the women mentors in my life. That’s the most important aspect for me.“To have seen the progression of this project was amazing, and we were able to receive an outpouring of messages of women in the United States saying, ‘This is awesome,’ and ‘This is so needed,’ which shows that this needs to be an ongoing conversation to bring about change.“We all just need to remember that although you may be one person, you can do so much, and together, we can do even more.”Tags: bishop kevin rhoades, Campus Ministry, Carol Ann Mooney, Center for Spirituality, Elizabeth Groppe, Grace Urankar, Kristen Millar, letters, millennial, Pope Francis, Vatican, Voices of Young Catholic Women Pope Francis asked, and Saint Mary’s delivered — literally.In the fall of 2013, 10 Saint Mary’s students, the Office of Campus Ministry and the Center for Spirituality (CFS) came together to discuss ways in which the Catholic Church could better reach young women around the world. Together, the group came to one conclusion: write to Pope Francis.last_img read more

19
Oct
2020

COVID-19 made us do the impossible: Print remotely

first_imgWhen the Jakarta city government declared a state of emergency and ordered companies to allow employees to work from home, we followed the directive and had reporters and editors work remotely. Also, to comply with the government’s encouragement of physical distancing, we urged reporters to prioritize their health and safety at the expense of direct access to sources.But one major problem remained: how to continue producing the newspaper. Producing the daily newspaper requires the physical presence of some of our staff in the newsroom to lay out the pages that are then delivered to the printing press.That was until earlier this week. With the the coronavirus showing no signs of abating, we decided to lock down our facilities and have the print production team start bringing the newspaper to life from the safety of their living rooms.It could have been a logistical nightmare, but with the exception of relocating two crucial pieces of hardware, the process was smooth sailing. If anything, this is something that we were preparing for. The newspaper you’re holding in your hands marks a first in The Jakarta Post’s 37 year history.The Post’s editorial team has seen it all, from the May 1998 riots, the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami in the Indian Ocean and the deadly flooding in 2013 that submerged much of Jakarta, to the New Order government’s threat to shut us down entirely.None of those historic events brought significant disruption to our production process. But COVID-19 is a danger that we cannot take lightly. In late February, unrelated to the outbreak of COVID-19, we decided to make changes to how we delivered news to you.For the first time in the Post’s history, we reconfigured the newsroom to deal with the changing landscape of the media industry, which puts speed and accuracy above anything else. With the change, we gave a significant degree of freedom to editors and reporters regarding when and where they could break stories.So if in the past month you’ve seen an uptick in rapid reporting on COVID-19, that’s a sign the new system has taken effect. Now, with only an internet connection, editors can coordinate a vast network of reporters, writers, photojournalists and multimedia journalists to produce the timely, dependable and relevant stories our readers have come to expect.Printing this newspaper remotely is the next logical step from the method we implemented in February.Like everyone else, we do not know when this pandemic will end, and we will continue remote production as long as conditions require it. It appears that working from home – in our case producing remotely – will likely be the new normal.But like everything that has come before, this too shall pass.– The PublisherTopics :last_img read more

20
Sep
2020

Babar Azam looks like a lost cow to me: Shoaib Akhtar

first_imgLAHORE: Former Pakistan speedster Shoaib Akhtar has lashed out at current Men in Green skipper Babar Azam and has questioned his decision-making ability following their defeat in the second T20I of the ongoing three-match series against England.England’s limited-overs captain Eoin Morgan scored an explosive half-century as the hosts chased down a record target of 196 to beat Pakistan by five wickets at the Old Trafford on Sunday. “Babar Azam looks like a lost cow to me. He is out there, not knowing what to do. It is important for him to take decisions on his own so that it could help him become a better captain in the coming times,” Akhtar said on his YouTube channel. “Babar will need to understand that the chances coming his way are not going to happen for the rest of his life, so he needs to make the most out of it,” he added. The ‘Rawalpindi Express’ also criticised the Pakistan team and its players for their insecure and confused nature. “Pakistan team are playing in a bio ‘insecure’ bubble, where each player is insecure. No one has an idea about whether they want to become a good captain or a good brand. “Confused selection, confused management, confused captain, confused team and confusion of everything. Teams are not made like this,” Akhtar said. IANSAlso Watch: Power Lines or Death Traps?last_img read more

17
Sep
2020

Former track and field star Hunt finds gridiron success with Mustangs

first_img Published on September 20, 2012 at 2:35 am Contact David: [email protected] | @DBWilson2 Margus Hunt never expected to be here.He was supposed to be in London this past summer competing in discus throw in the Olympics. Instead, he spent the summer working out with the Southern Methodist football team in Dallas.“Ten years ago I knew that at that point I was going to be at the London Olympics this year,” Hunt said. “Things change, people change and you just have to make do with the decisions and opportunities ahead of you. … It’s been a fun ride.”Hunt arrived in Dallas from Karksi-Nuia, Estonia, in 2007 to train with Mustangs track and field coach Dave Wollman. But when Hunt finally arrived at SMU, the school had dropped its men’s program.Without the track and field scholarship, Hunt would have to leave Dallas and return to Estonia.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBut he didn’t want to do that; he loved SMU too much. So at the suggestion of Wollman, Hunt began training with the football team, trying to earn a football scholarship as a defensive lineman.“I only had the financial possibility to come here for a year and we knew that it was going to be a long shot to get the program back,” Hunt said. “Once the one year started to come to an end, we were officially with a problem, whether or not I was going to have to go back to Estonia and try to figure something out.“I really didn’t want to leave SMU. I liked it over here. I liked Dallas, I liked the campus, I liked everything about it and, at that time, a lot of the football coaches were always in the weight room and they told me just to try out.”In just three years of playing organized football, Hunt has become one of the most intriguing prospects in college football. At 6 feet 8 inches and 280 pounds, the 25-year-old former track and field star still has been clocked running a 4.7 in the 40-yard dash.During the Mustangs’ 52-0 win over Stephen F. Austin, Hunt set an NCAA record with his ninth career blocked field goal. A week later, in a 48-3 loss to Texas A&M, Hunt blocked his 16th career kick, good for second on the all-time list.That kick-blocking ability comes from a rare combination of size and speed.“He has rare explosion,” Mustangs special teams coach Frank Gansz said. “If you just take the fact that he’s 6-8, you see those things. You watch him come off the ball and this guy’s a gifted athlete. He could probably do anything he wanted to, he could play basketball.”Ask Gansz about Hunt and he’ll spend minutes raving about the senior, not only about his physical ability, but how well he’s picked up the game in just three years.“He’s a very analytical-type kid,” Gansz said. “He understands things. … You’re better off sometimes having something that’s a blank slate and working with it than you are when he’s coached by a lot of different coaches.”One area where Hunt had to change was in his training.As a thrower, Hunt would exert large amounts of energy every 10 or so minutes. He wasn’t prepared for the every down play of college football. Game film from his freshman season often shows Hunt frequently patting his head to signal he needed to come out.“He’s never experienced that kind of training for, for that kind of athletic team,” said Wollman, the former SMU track and field coach and now Hunt’s personal trainer. “But now, after this past three years of conditioning and power, he’s as fit as any big man I’ve ever seen.”Hunt had never even heard of football growing up in Estonia. At least not the American version.“I played European football, which you know as soccer,” Hunt said with a laugh. “I never really knew that much about it when I came here.”Instead, Hunt was a world-class thrower. Hunt won gold medals in both the shot put and the discus throw in the Junior World Championships in Beijing.When he was younger, Hunt competed in nearly every track and field event. That has gone to help him become the dominant and versatile athlete he is today.“I used to do every event out there,” Hunt said. “That’s what my coach back home wanted me to do. He made me do every possible track and field event so I would be more athletic and more prepared, just dynamic.”Hunt still looks back on his journey, and it’s still unbelievable.The next step for him could be the NFL. Right now, Hunt still fits the bill as an under-the-radar prospect, likely destined for the second or third round. But where he has the best chance to raise his stock is at the NFL Draft Combine.In addition to Hunt’s 4.7 40-yard dash potential, the defensive lineman has also benched 225 pounds 35 times, cleared 384 pounds and snatched 345 pounds.And most important, he’ll just keep getting better.“This kid is an ascending player,” Gansz said. “He’s still got a ways to go, and I think he’s a great player. That’s the best thing about this guy, he’s an ascending athlete.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

29
Aug
2020

Razer and Super Evil Megacorp announce strategic partnership

first_imgSuper Evil Megacorp, the mobile game developer behind Vainglory has announced a strategic partnership with Razer, the lifestyle brand for gamers. The partnership will see the two work together to further advance mobile esports and it follows the recent launch of the Razer phone.Cloud9 lifting the Unified Western Championship trophy (Credit: Ravi Lakhani/Super Evil Mega Co)The two companies collaborated for the launch of the Razer Phone in the UK, San Francisco and at DreamHack Winter 2017 in Sweden. The partnership will see a Vainglory event held at the Microsoft Store in New York City, and Razer will now be the title sponsor of the Vainglory World Championship in Singapore. The Vainglory World Championship is edging ever closer, and will take place at the Kallang Theater in Singapore between the 14th and 17th December and will feature the twelve best Vainglory teams in the world battling it for superiority. Singapore will be a fitting host as it’s where Vainglory’s alpha was first launched and is home to Razer’s Co-Founder and CEO Min-Liang Tan. The World Championship will also showcase for the first time Vainglory’s 5 versus 5 mode which has been eagerly anticipated by the community for quite some time. “Super Evil Megacorp and Razer share the same fundamental belief, that gamers are gamers no matter the device they play on, and deserve the best experience that technology has to offer,” said Kristian Segerstrale, CEO of Super Evil Megacorp. “We’re honored to partner with Razer at a very exciting time, to further advance our mission to bring the best gaming experience possible on mobile devices.”“With a 120 Hz UltraMotion™ display and Dolby Atmos® and THX®-certified audio hardware, Razer Phone was perfected for playing Vainglory on-the-go,” says Min-Liang Tan, CEO and co-founder of Razer. “We are incredibly happy to support Super Evil Megacorp with the only smartphone that can handle the maxed framerates and audio capabilities of Vainglory, their mobile MOBA played by gamers all over the world.”Esports Insider says: Congratulations to both Super Evil and Razer on what we’re sure will be a fruitful partnership. We look forward to seeing a first glance at the five versus five mode.last_img read more

26
Aug
2020

Clayton Kershaw lasts three innings in return as Dodgers lose to Marlins

first_imgDodgers third baseman Justin Turner said Kershaw “looked awesome” to him and he agreed “100 percent” with Roberts’ participation award.“Definitely,” Turner said. “I told (Kershaw) after he was done, ‘Seeing you back out there was awesome.’ He said, ‘I wish I could have done a little better.’ I told him, ‘You being back out there is as good as it gets.’”Getting Kershaw to lower his exacting standards and accept that was a tough sell even though Friday’s start was essentially a second rehab start made on a big-league mound.“No, I can’t (look at it that way),” Kershaw said. “I’m thankful that I got to come back. That’s definite. Steve and B-Mac (physical therapist Steve Smith and strength and conditioning coach Brandon McDaniel) have been with me non-stop to get me back and a lot of people put in a lot of work to help me get back. I understand that from that standpoint and I’m thankful for that. But at the same time, I’m out there to win. I’m out there to get guys out very consistently and I didn’t do that tonight.”Making his first big-league start since June 26 with only one three-inning rehab start to test his injured back, he gave up a solo home run to J.T. Realmuto on his sixth pitch, three hits and another run in the second inning and an infield single in the third. Kershaw threw 66 pitches in his three innings, allowed five hits, struck out five and didn’t walk a batter. He did become the first major-league pitcher to reach 150 strikeouts in a season with fewer than 10 walks (he has only walked nine batters in 124 innings this season).“Not great, obviously. I threw a lot of pitches,” he self-reported. “I was averaging 20-plus pitches an inning so regardless if the pitch count was in effect or not it probably would have been a short night.“You try to look at the positives and I got to pitch again so that’s good. But you don’t want to be a detriment to the team either. I’ll definitely try and pitch a little deeper next time.”Kershaw’s breaking pitches, in particular, did not have their usual bite and he acknowledged “I was in the middle of the plate more than I should be.” But his back “felt fine” even after a Matrix-like contortion to avoid Jose Fernandez’s liner through the box in the second inning and a twisting play to field Christian Yelich’s infield single in the third.The other stuff should be fixable with time and more innings of work.“They better be. Yeah, they better be. I think so,” Kershaw said. “I was throwing strikes. They just weren’t quality strikes. Get two strikes on a guy, I wasn’t able to finish him off quickly. They had long at-bats. Credit to them, they did well. But I think more than anything I wasn’t able to produce the quality strikes tonight consistently.”Kershaw is scheduled to make his next start Wednesday at Yankee Stadium, then lines up to face the second-place San Francisco Giants in the first game of their visit to Dodger Stadium Sept. 19-21. By then, the expectations might have risen. But for now, Roberts was philosophical about having a mere mortal Kershaw in his rotation.“Honestly, I think that he is as human as we all are,” Roberts said. “I think where we’re at as a club — we’re in a good spot. And so … yeah, if he would have been three, four innings scoreless, six punch(outs) — that would have been great. But you still have to look a little bit deeper than the numbers.”The Dodgers’ offensive numbers were pretty shallow Friday. The Marlins ace, Fernandez, held the Dodgers to three hits in seven scoreless innings.The Dodgers had opportunities against Fernandez early in the game. They had two runners on in each of the first two innings and Josh Reddick doubled with one out in the fourth.All five were stranded as the Dodgers went 0 for 5 with runners in scoring position against Fernandez. He retired 16 of the final 18 batters he faced, 12 on strikeouts while tying his career-high with 14 strikeouts in those seven innings.After Reddick’s double, the Dodgers didn’t get another runner past first base until Yasmani Grandal’s long home run off Marlins reliever Fernando Rodney in the ninth inning broke up the shutout. MIAMI >> It felt like a win to everyone but the man who took the loss.Seventy-five days after his most recent start — and nearly two months after he admitted doubting whether he would pitch again this season — Clayton Kershaw lasted just three innings in his return from the disabled list as the Dodgers lost 4-1 to the Miami Marlins Friday night.“Just to see him on the mound was great,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “And in talking to him after the start, he came back into the dugout and said he felt good.“Obviously every game is important. But for Clayton to be back on the mound, I think that’s a win for us.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more