Tagged: 上海后花园龙凤

19
Sep
2020

Krutwig carries Loyola of Chicago over Drake 64-60

first_imgKrutwig carries Loyola of Chicago over Drake 64-60 February 25, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditCHICAGO (AP) — Cameron Krutwig scored 17 points, grabbed seven rebounds and made three assists and Loyola Chicago held off Drake 64-60 on Tuesday night for its ninth straight home win.Tate Hall and Marquise Kennedy scored 11 points apiece for the Ramblers (20-10, 12-5 Missouri Valley Conference), who made 19 of 31 free throws.Liam Robbins scored 13 points with 10 rebounds and four blocks and Garrett Sturtz added 17 points with eight rebounds for Drake (18-12, 8-9). Roman Penn had six assists. Associated Press The Ramblers evened the season series against the Bulldogs with the win. Drake defeated Loyola of Chicago 65-62 on Jan. 7. Loyola of Chicago finishes out the regular season against Bradley on the road on Saturday. Drake finishes out the regular season against Northern Iowa at home on Saturday.___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.comlast_img read more

17
Sep
2020

Academic Senate votes in favor of two-day break

first_imgThe Academic Senate voted in favor of instituting a two-day break in the eighth week of the fall semester on Wednesday. The resolution will now be presented to President C. L.  Max Nikias, Provost Michael Quick, Vice President for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry and Director of Campus Activities Gabriel Valenzuela. There is still no set time when this fall break could be integrated into the USC academic calendar. According to the former Undergraduate Student Government President Edwin Saucedo, efforts to pass the resolution have been underway for several months. He said the passing of the resolution through the Academic Senate was the culmination of the work of many previous USG leaders who had also attempted to institute the break. “This is a resolution that has gone through our student government for the last three or four years, so it’s something that’s been in the works since I remember arriving at USC,” Saucedo said. “Without the professors and the Academic Senate on board, this is not a possibility because the fall break does not just affect students, but professors teaching the students as well.” In the period between Labor Day and Thanksgiving break, USC students have 56 consecutive instructional days, one of the longest among elite universities. The extended educational period has inflicted undue stress and anxiety on students. “We were looking at the fact that USC is a top 25 school with a semester system, and it has the longest academic semester,” Saucedo said. “Looking at the state of mental health on our campus, a lot of students struggle with stress and being able to juggle school and a social life and work and career opportunities. We wanted to model after the spring semester where we have continuous breaks.” USG worked in conjunction with the Engemann Student Health Center to gather data on students. Counseling Services reported that appointments at the health center reach a semester-high between weeks 10 and 12, which does not align with the Center for Disease Control’s reported flu season. “We’re looking at when are students the most stressed and frequenting the Health Center the most,” Saucedo said. “We saw a spike up in the eighth through 10th weeks. Choosing the eighth week allowed us to be proactive as opposed to reactive. Having a break in the 10th or 11th week might be too late to really solve the issue that we’re trying to get at.” Saucedo credited the approval to the increased awareness of the importance of mental health on campus and greater conversation surrounding students’ well-being. “Over the last couple of years, the conversation around mental health on campus has really changed,” Saucedo said. “Ideally, we want to continue providing more resources for our students. It’s OK to be stressed but also OK to ask for help.”last_img read more

05
Aug
2020

East Bengal could celebrate its centenary with a game against Manchester United!

first_imgImage Courtesy: East Bengal Ultras TV/PAAdvertisement nNBA Finals | Brooklyn VsyatzWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E1dv2( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) rjWould you ever consider trying this?😱d0dpCan your students do this? 🌚7yi5Roller skating! Powered by Firework The year of 2020 will mark the 100th anniversary of India’s one of the most legendary clubs, East Bengal FC. What could be the best way to celebrate its century old establishment and rich history? An exhibition match with one of the most successful and influential clubs in the world- Manchester United!Advertisement Image Courtesy: East Bengal Ultras TV/PAAccording to reports from Debabrata Sarkar, an executive committee member of East Bengal, Allan Dawson, the Director of Football at Old Trafford along with a four personnel team had fixed a meeting with Aroop Biswas, the current Minister of Department of Youth Services and Sports in West Bengal today.They also surveyed the Salt Lake Stadium, one of the three grounds of the Red & Gold Brigade, and are planning to fix a match with the club as part of United’s pre season tour of Asia before the commencement of 2020-21 Premier League.Advertisement Established on 1st August 1920, East Bengal  has won three National Football League (currently known as the I-League) titles, eight Federation Cups, three Indian Super Cups, and numerous other titles. They share a historical rivalry with another legendary side Mohun Bagan.However, the total cost of the match will skyrocket the expenses to a monumental 30 crore, 80% of which will be going to the EPL giants to make an appearance in Kolkata.Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

04
Aug
2020

Sea Bright Pizzeria: ‘Bigger and Stronger’

first_imgBy John BurtonSEA BRIGHT – Cono and Karen Trezza are happy to be back kneading pizza dough and feeding their customers.The couple’s business, Sea Bright Pizzeria, has been rebuilt after being closed for eight months after being wrecked by Super Storm Sandy. They reopened in June.Karen and Cono Trezza, owners of Sea Bright Pizzeria, are happy to be up and running after their building was severely damaged last October by Super Storm Sandy.“To get back to work after everything … I can’t explain how it feels,” Cono said, trying to collect his thoughts about what they have gone through, what it all means and the emotions he has been feeling as they work to get their business back on track.“It’s the American dream, you know?” said Cono, who came to the U.S. from his native Italy in 1980.The Trezzas, who live in Lincroft with their two sons, Luca, 12, and Christian, 11, first opened their pizza restaurant on Ocean Avenue in 2005. They moved a few doors down the street to their 1068 Ocean Ave. location on what turned out to be the eve of Hurricane Irene in 2011. Having weathered that challenge reasonably well in a building that is probably nearly 100 years old, they figured they were good.But then came Sandy.The October 2012 storm devastated Sea Bright, including the pizzeria. Especially hard-hit was the Ocean Avenue business district.“Structurally, the front of the store was blown out,” by the waves and the water that flooded the area, Karen recalled. “Everything inside was demolished.”“The whole façade,” which was fronted by glass, Cono said, “was gone – destroyed.“Every piece of equipment was upside down,” including the large pizza ovens and much of it ruined.Cono returned to Sea Bright the day after the storm to check on his business.“It was shocking,” he said.The full extent of the damage and what it would entail to return to business did not sink in for weeks.While Karen had second thoughts about returning, her husband never did. He did find the prospect of rebuilding “daunting. You didn’t know where to start,” he said.An extra boost to the Trezzas’ spirits came from an unexpected source. As the state’s first lady Mary Pat Christie was touring the borough, Cono was cleaning up debris when she walked by. The governor’s wife asked Cono how he was doing and what could she do to help. “I told her, ‘It’s OK. We’ll rebuild, bigger and better than ever.’”Earlier this year, Gov. Chris Christie quoted Cono in his State of the State address, Cono noted with pride.For Karen, hearing the governor talk about his love for the Jersey Shore “really turned me around” and she embraced rebuilding.“We gutted the whole building; we tore up the floor,” Cono said. They had to replace everything.When they first worked on the restaurant in 2011, they installed the electrical equipment under the floor. This time they placed it about 6-feet high, hopefully high enough to spare it from any future flooding. The Trezzas decided to fill in the building’s crawlspace, a move recommended by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).They also are getting flood panels, which can be put up along the building’s front and rear areas in case of a serious storm or flood alert and hopefully will mitigate flooding.None of this was cheap, with rebuilding costing about $300,000, Karen said. “We were underinsured,” which left them looking for available U.S. Small Business Association loans for assistance.Cono is pleased with the outcome, including the new tables, equipment and brick walls. “The first time we thought we did it right,” he said. “But now it’s done right.”The push was to open in time for the all-important summer season, they said. “If we lost the summer, it could have made the difference” between coming back and not, Cono said.“The summer is huge; it was a must,” Karen said.When they reopened June 28, they were greeted by many of their loyal customers who came to show their support – and for some, to express surprise that Sea Bright Pizzeria was able to get back so soon, Karen and Cono said.During those first days, “I made a lot of pizzas, a lot,” said Cono, who ran out of dough at one point.Now it’s all about looking forward, they said.“We’re here to stay,”Cono stressed. “Bigger and stronger.”last_img read more

04
Aug
2020

Henry Hudson Trail Segment To Undergo Renovations

first_imgA popular segment of the Henry Hudson Trail in Atlantic Highlands that suffered serious damage due to flooding in Super Storm Sandy in 2012 is to undergo repairs to make it more resilient in the future. The path is used by pedestrians and bikers. Photo: Joseph SapiaBy Joseph SapiaATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – The portion of the Henry Hudson Trail in Atlantic Highlands that was destroyed by 2012’s Super Storm Sandy storm surge should be fully reconstructed with a more sustainable design by the end of the year.Since the storm, the scenic 1-¼ mile walking, bicycling, and equestrian trail from Popamora Point at the Atlantic Highlands/Highlands border to Atlantic Highlands marina has remained open, but in what the park system describes as the “primitive condition” of compacted soil.The 14-foot high storm surge had eroded the toe of the bluff making passage difficult or even hazardous in some conditions. It washed away trail surfacing and decimated the wooden boardwalks, said Joseph Sardonia, supervising landscape architect for the Monmouth County Park System. “It was like toothpicks,” Sardonia said. “It was amazing.”The project is estimated to cost about $900,000 to $1 million. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will reimburse the Park System 80 percent of the cost, and the county and borough will split the remaining 20 percent, according to the Park System.Two women walk along the Henry Hudson Trail on the Highlands-Atlantic Highlands boundary. The trail is open, but the Monmouth County Park System considers its compacted dirt state as “primitive.” Photo: Joseph SapiaThe improvements to help the trail survive occasional flooding and storm surges include: diverting runoff to Sandy Hook Bay under the trail to protect against erosion, resurfacing the trail using both pavement and stone dust and rebuilding the walkway with prefabricated concrete, Sardonia said.The Monmouth County Board of Recreation Commissioners hopes to award a contract to successful bidders in July, see work start after Labor Day and complete the project by the end of 2016.Trails will be closed to visitors during renovations, according to the Park System.Leo Cervantes, 46, who lives in Highlands and walks the affected part of the trail once or twice a week if he has time, looks forward to improving the trail.“I guess, if they do it the right way, it’ll last longer,” said Cervantes, who owns Chilangos Restaurant in Highlands.Catalina Giraldo, 30, of Highlands was walking the trail on a recent day with Cervantes and Julian Gaviria, 26, who was visiting from Colombia. Giraldo called the county project “positive.”It was Gaviria’s first time on the trail.“We woke up this morning, ‘Come on, Julian,’ because Cati and I walk it,” Cervantes said.The Henry Hudson Trail, which follows a combination of roads and unused railroad right-of-ways, travels from Sandy Hook to Freehold for about 28 miles.From Sandy Hook to Aberdeen, the trail also is known as the Bayshore Trail.The county hopes to extend the trail another 7-1/2 miles to Farmingdale. From Farmingdale, it could connect with the Edgar E. Felix Trail to Manasquan.last_img read more

04
Aug
2020

Middletown School Budget Includes Hiring New Security Officers

first_imgBy Jay Cook  |MIDDLETOWN – On the heels of yet another fatal school shooting earlier in the day, this time in Maryland, Middletown’s Board of Education took steps on Tuesday, March 20 to help ensure each of its 17 schools will be safer and more secure in the future.At the introduction of the district school budget hearing, Middletown schools’ business administrator Amy Gallagher said one of the “bigger areas” in the 2018-2019 budget focuses on creating 15 new “Safe School Officer” roles. The spending plan calls for a $455,952 expenditure for safe school officers, which Gallagher called “SSOs.”The four security guards currently split between the district’s two high schools – Middletown North and Middletown South – are to be retrained and become part of that team.“As you may or may not know, right now we don’t have security guards specifically assigned to the elementary schools,” Gallagher said. “This would assign security guards to the elementary schools and also bolster what we have in the middle schools and high schools.”Earlier in the day, authorities in Maryland said a 17-year-old male student shot and wounded three other students at Great Mills High School with a handgun before he was stopped and died after a gun fight with an armed school resource officer on duty at the high school. One of the victims, a 16-year old girl, died later on Tuesday.Middletown Schools Superintendent William O. George explained to about 35 parents in attendance how proposed SSOs are different from school resource officers. The main difference, George said, is that an SSO would not be permitted to carry a concealed firearm into the school. He emphasized that option is not on the table right now. SSOs are also school employees, while school resource officers are police department employees.An SSO “works directly with the school system and will not be carrying a weapon but would be a retired law enforcement professional with background and training with other responsibilities in the school,” George explained.George said school security discussions, in Middletown and across the county, have increased and accelerated recently. He met with the Monmouth County Superintendent of Schools’ roundtable, has had talks with the Monmouth County Police Chief Association and will meet soon with the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office as well as other state departments, said George.“Maintaining a hardened front” is the main benefit of having an SSO in each of Middletown’s schools, George said.While supportive of proposed security increases, some concerned parents spoke up during public comment to question the viability of retired professionals and whether or not concealed carry should be an option.“If they don’t have any type of weapon, then what’s the difference between (an SSO) and just a retired elderly person running around if the school gets breached?” questioned resident Jen Rosen.“I think a trained law enforcement professional is fantastic – I think they add a value – but my question is on the age and the fitness,” she continued. “We’re talking about people who are retired for a reason.”Maryellen Chappell, who has children in three district schools, said her husband is a retired police officer and that she wholly supports having an armed officer in the schools“The time is now. We just had a shooting today. And you know what, there was one fatality, but that’s one fatality too much,” Chappell said. “But that guy was taken out by a security guard that was trained to take that person out.”George reaffirmed that Middletown schools “are not having armed, concealed carry at this time,” but added this process could “create the opportunity for that in the future if that’s the direction over time.”Also part of the budget increases to school security were a $160,000 cost for replacing the public address system at Middletown South, as well as at least $100,000 budgeted for replacing secure APR doors at the elementary schools.The push for improved infrastructure highlights a two-year initiative where Middletown’s schools have budgeted $2.3 million over the past two years for security and surveillance measures.The 2018-2019 proposed budget of approximately $141.6 million includes an estimated 1.8 percent school levy increase to homeowners in Middletown. A homeowner with a home assessed at the average value of $423,427 would pay approximately an additional $156 under the spending plan. The tax levy would generate over $2.4 million in new revenue for the school district.The tentative budget will be voted on at the Board’s March 28 meeting and a public hearing and final adoption will likely occur at the April 25 meeting.This article was first published in the March 22-29, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more