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20
Oct
2020

All sides played a role in speaker backlash

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The backlash from writer Nancy Jo Sales’ visit to Ballston Spa High School [BSHS] recently seems like a never-ending finger-pointing debacle.From an outsider’s perspective, it appears a better show of respect and decorum should have occurred among all three sides involved — students, school officials and Ms. Sales herself. This wasn’t the case, and so here we are.Sales has written extensively about modern teen culture, studying American teenagers since the 1990s. So perhaps it’s safe to suggest she should know a thing or two in relating to them. With this incident at BSHS, this wasn’t Sales’ first trip to the rodeo. She has spoken at many schools before, including another one in the Capital District. From various reports, Sales’ demeanor toward the students at BSHS appeared more disciplinarian than supportive — especially when commotion ensued. That’s not going to win much respect with students. And as someone with as much experience reporting on and speaking with teenagers for over 20 years, she should know that.Additionally, if there’s a cyber-bullying problem at this school, Sales should have left that to the professionals at the school in addressing the issue. That’s not up to her to decide. Her training is in literature, with a MFA [Master in Fine Arts] in writing — not psychology, not education. Her job that day was to give a talk, to connect with students, and offer them peace of mind.Instead, the students were subjected to a patronizing tone by yet another adult, on a stage, talking down to them, brushing aside their voices. Teachers and administrators past and present know full well that technique rarely works in developing a good rapport with teenagers.Later, a good teacher will spin this unfortunate event into a positive learning tool for the students at BSHS. How will Sales spin this event? Robert O’BrienAshville, North Carolina The writer is a former area resident.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

20
Oct
2020

Writer owes apology for insulting women

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Newspaper editors must dream of letters such as the hate-filled, misogynistic diatribe from Jim Schaefer in the Jan. 14 Gazette. He laments the #MeToo movement in which women are, finally, uniting to demand equal pay and the right not to be attacked. Poor Jimmy. Why is he so threatened?His lumping of Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand with Gloria Alred and Megyn Kelly amplifies his stunning ignorance. A congresswoman’s words constitute a “righteous rant?” If he wants a rant, he need only look to the president’s absurd and insulting tweets and words. I’ll leave it to others to dissect the clichés and arrogance displayed in the letter.Mr. Schaefer, I’m a geneticist and author. I’m not a stripper or a gold digger. Get over your stereotypes. I believe you owe an apology to many Gazette readers.  Ricki LewisScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…last_img read more

20
Oct
2020

Support Cobb in 21st District Dem primary

first_imgOn June 26, New York state voters will have an opportunity to cast an important primary vote for our representation in Congressional District 21 for the 116th Congress. There are many qualified candidates on the Democratic side, but one has set herself apart as most deserving: Tedra Cobb.Considering the many reasons to choose a candidate, these stand out: integrity, energy, intention, leadership and experience. Tedra Cobb is the only candidate who matches all criteria with a record of elected public service and bipartisanship.Unlike our current representative, Elise Stefanik, Cobb has lived in the district for decades, raised a family and started a business, all the while serving her community. With a pubic record of accountability, Cobb’s supporters in her home county of St. Lawrence enthusiastically embrace her candidacy, providing us with the largest number of petition signatures of any Democratic congressional candidate in this race –which bodes well for the election win in the fall.Tedra Cobb embodies the independence, grit and kindness of the North Country. Her election effort has exhibited the leadership necessary to bring the district the kind of candidate we deserve: one who listens, one who is accessible to the constituents and one who is representative of our best selves. It’s for these reasons that I ask you to vote for Tedra Cobb to represent the people of Congressional District 21.Julie A. WashSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

20
Oct
2020

£500m spree marks UK debut for WP Carey

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20
Oct
2020

Canada waterworld

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

20
Oct
2020

Wales is getting its just reward

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20
Oct
2020

London projects lift Quintain results

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20
Oct
2020

Allsop’s investment team nets £45m birthday haul

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19
Oct
2020

PREMIUMActivists criticize Jakarta for lack of emissions data transparency

first_imgTopics : LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? Linkedin Log in with your social account Facebook Google The Jakarta administration is falling short of its responsibility to disclose detailed emissions data of factories that contribute to air pollution, environmental advocacy groups have said.The Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL) is calling for more details in the administration’s periodic report on the private sector’s emissions.Prevailing regulations require all local administrations, including Jakarta, to collect emissions data from businesses that might harm air quality and that the businesses report the results of their pollution control assessments. The 1999 government regulation on air pollution control orders local administrations to perform an assessment on air pollution control at least once a year, while the 2012 government regulation on environmental permits says that businesses have to file their reports once every six months.The 2009 Environmen… emission #airpollution #Jakarta Jakarta-air-pollution air-pollution #emission environmentlast_img read more

19
Oct
2020

Global recession risk spikes as world powers down, markets slump

first_imgInvestors are sounding the alarm that policy makers aren’t doing enough, with a deepening rout in global stocks and strains in credit markets compounding the concern over the economic outlook. Stocks were primed for more heavy losses in Asia on Friday after the worst Wall Street session since 1987.The virus “has disrupted the global economy and has quickly morphed into a dislocation in financial markets too,” Morgan Stanley economists led by Chetan Ahya said in a report to clients in which they warned of a “rising risk” of a full-blown global recession.“The need of the hour is a quick, sizeable response from public health, monetary and fiscal authorities,” they said.Read also: Time-out: IDX halts trading as shares plunge 5% Dashed are the hopes from just a few weeks ago that the world economy would track a V-shaped trajectory — a sharp first-quarter slump in growth followed by a second-quarter rebound. Now, the biggest economic shock since the 2008 financial crisis is raising the risk of a worldwide recession, with the debate shifting to how long and deep the slump will be.China is already on course for what could be its first quarterly contraction in decades. In the US, a Bloomberg Economics model suggests a 53 percent chance that the 11-year expansion will end within a year. The economies of Japan, Germany, France and Italy were already shrinking or stalled before the virus outbreak, and the UK is wobbling amid Brexit uncertainty.As the virus spreads, the threat grows of a phenomenon economists refer to as a feedback loop — a vicious cycle in which a country that starts to recover domestically then suffers diminished demand from abroad as other nations succumb, prolonging the downturn.At Pacific Investment Management Co., global chief economic adviser Joachim Fels says the US and Europe face the “distinct possibility” of a recession. Former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, a paid contributor to Bloomberg News, says the coronavirus may prove to be the most serious crisis of the century so far and puts the odds of a US recession at 80 percent.Traditionally more conservative in calling a recession, Wall Street economists are also downgrading their forecasts. Those at Bank of America Corp. on Wednesday cut their global growth forecast for 2020 from 2.8 percent to 2.2 percent. That’s “in spitting range of a typical global recession” and well below the world’s long-term trend of 3.5 percent, they said.Read also: Global stocks suffer historic rout, shrugging of central bank stepsCounterparts at JPMorgan Chase & Co. told clients this week that the risk of a global recession “has risen materially.” To revive their confidence, they said they need to see a fading of the virus, a stronger and more creative response by economic policy makers, and for firms and banks not to slash jobs or lending.They also argued that the tumble in the cost of oil may not necessarily boost growth as much as historically because consumers will pocket the windfall from cheaper fuel prices.Policy makers are already struggling to keep up, adding to concern that falling demand won’t be cushioned enough by stimulus.The Federal Reserve’s emergency interest rate cut of March 3 failed to buoy investor confidence, adding to pressure on its officials to ease monetary policy and perhaps even slash rates to zero when they reconvene next week if not sooner. There are also calls for it to follow the Bank of England in channeling assistance to parts of the economy in most need.European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde got her chance to act on Thursday after telling regional leaders earlier in the week that their economy risked a shock that echoed the crisis of the last decade if they didn’t urgently. The ECB announced what it called a “ comprehensive” package that included more quantitative easing and tools to increase liquidity, but disappointed investor calls for interest rates to be cut.The ECB already has negative rates so there’s little room to reduce them, a problem for Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda too.We’re all Japan now as virus drives low-rates world toward zeroThat leaves fiscal policy, which should be more potent than monetary policy because it can be targeted and delivered in size. But governments are again proving sluggish in getting ahead of the crisis with the majority waiting for their nations to become infected before shifting and then only slowly.While more governments are rolling out stimulus packages worldwide and are offering more than US$130 billion of virus-relief steps, Trump’s administration has been slow crafting a plan after initially questioning the need for one.German Chancellor Angela Merkel promised to do “whatever is necessary” on Wednesday. While the rhetoric has yet to be matched by a fiscal push in Europe’s largest economy, her administration is prepared to abandon its long-standing balanced-budget policy to help finance steps to contain the virus fallout.Read also: Europe grinds to halt as ECB is criticized for too little actionMuch of the economic data have yet to bear out the magnitude of the pain to the global economy. In some ways, though, the virus outbreak’s impact is more worrisome than even the financial crisis, given that it’s hitting a multitude of consumer and business channels and has crushed prospects for a full recovery in some sectors, said Taimur Baig, chief economist at DBS Bank in Singapore.“This is the opposite transition from the crisis propagation perspective — now we have the services sector basically coming to a standstill worldwide” while the financial system still is relatively healthy, said Baig, a former economist at the International Monetary Fund.While the crisis of 2008-09 was a “classic financial crisis,” this time, “it’s not about fixing banks or putting capital in there — it’s about saying the pandemic has ended. That’s what makes it very uncertain” as the virus has proved so hard to control, he said.Topics : A pandemic-driven global recession is becoming more likely by the day as the flow of goods, services and people face ever-increasing restrictions and financial markets slump.In just the past day or so, President Donald Trump curbed travel to the US from Europe, Italy’s government ordered almost every shop to close, India suspended most visas and Ireland partially shut down. Twitter Inc. joined companies telling employees to work at home and the National Basketball Association suspended its season.While such announcements are aimed at containing the coronavirus, each quarantined city, canceled flight, scrapped sporting event and scuppered conference will hammer demand this quarter and likely longer. An initial consumer rush to stock up on supplies may be followed by months of cautious restraint.last_img read more