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27
Feb
2021

It’s Now Possible to Run Unified Storage in the Cloud with Dell EMC Unity VSA Cloud Edition

first_imgThis post by Craig Bernero has been retired. Check out this post by Joe Caradonna which provides an update on Dell EMC Unity Cloud Edition.All customers, large or small enterprises, firmly established or relatively new, are deploying storage and servers in new and innovative ways; far differently than a just few years ago.  Today, most IT environments are highly virtualized and leverage the cloud for cost-optimized data placement. For Midrange customers, our new Dell EMC Cloud Edition software helps drive new flexibility with the cloud and virtualized infrastructures. With even more features for the cloud, and more options to deploy Dell EMC Unity as SDS (Software Defined Storage), converged systems, or as traditional hardware, Dell EMC Unity is the ideal platform for all VMware environments. And with this release, we deliver even more options to deploy efficient, simple and flexible storage.Dell EMC’s Unity platform is the number one Midrange storage platform in the market. We’re listening to you, and based on your feedback, we’ve added numerous new features. Recent innovation includes in-line compression and deduplication, MetroSync, and a wide range of security certifications help our customers deploy Dell EMC Unity over the widest range of workloads possible. Our customers also use Dell EMC Unity on purpose-built hardware, engineered converged infrastructure platforms and software defined storage.In this version, we’ve added a diverse set of cloud-related features that leverage the scale and ease of access of the cloud. Many customers look to merge the flexibility of a software defined storage with the scalability and flexibility of VMware Cloud, and we’re delighted to now provide those features.  Dell EMC Unity platform users now have a virtual data center which expands outside the confines of traditional physical space, and VMware Cloud users now have access to the extensive host of Dell EMC Unity file services, data protection and storage management features.  Every type of Dell EMC Unity deployment benefits from more options and more flexibility.Dell EMC Unity VSA Cloud EditionCustomers can deploy Dell EMC Unity either on traditional hardware or software with Unity VSA (virtual storage appliance), and the features are identical. The Dell EMC Unity VSA Cloud Edition provides a unified storage management environment with block, file and VVols support, as well as snapshot, replication and scheduling services.  And the intuitive user interface, now based on HTML 5, is identical for every version as well, so all users are immediately at home and productive.  And we provide full integration for VMware environments including VSI and ESI plugins, and VAAI support.At Home in the CloudThe Dell EMC Unity VSA Cloud Edition is deployed and certified on a standard VMware ESXi server.  With VMware Cloud available on AWS (Amazon Web Services), the cloud-based version of Dell EMC Unity is deployed quickly, ideal for test and development, and as a cost-effective replication destination.Dell EMC Unity VSA Cloud Edition also brings its robust file services to the cloud.  Providing more flexibility and portability, the VMware Hybrid Cloud Extension enables large-scale data migrations between cloud environments and the users’ on-premise Dell EMC Unity hardware and virtual environments.Dell EMC Unity customers seeking cloud deployments for their business now have a path without learning anything new – it couldn’t be easier. The same Dell EMC Unity operating environment and intuitive user interface are now available in all environments, in the cloud or as traditional hardware. For those adopting the cloud today, or those considering multi-cloud in the future, Dell EMC Unity is ready on your timetable, so you get to pick the timing and the product version that best meets your needs.The Road AheadAccording to IDC, the total spending on IT infrastructure for the cloud is $52.3B and growing at 10.9% annually.  Whenever you’re ready to jump in, we’re ready too.  With the new Dell EMC Unity VSA Cloud Edition, both first-time cloud users and more established multi-cloud IT shops will benefit from the feature-rich capabilities in Dell EMC Unity, now optimized and packaged for the cloud. Let us know what you think, we’re always interested in your constructive feedback.last_img read more

27
Feb
2021

In Search of the Perfect Workplace

first_imgEach and every day, a multitude of new hires join Dell Technologies worldwide. As a new hire, it is perfectly normal to feel anxious about a new environment. I can still remember my first day and how it took me forever to choose my outfit, and even longer to figure out how I could leave a good first impression on my colleagues and managers. Luckily, though, it wasn’t long before I felt at home in my new workplace, surrounded by so many inspiring people.I felt the need to portrait a sincere and helpful summary of several discoveries I made as “the new guy”, at the Dell Casablanca office, and why I feel I found the perfect place to work.Mentorship At the beginning of my journey with Dell Technologies I had an amazing opportunity to broaden my networking abilities and polish my social skills by meeting a lot of new, interesting and passionate people. Some of these people grew to have a tremendous impact on my career and how I perceived my future role in the company. As expected, certain colleagues grabbed my attention, thanks to their extraordinary life and work balance. One of these people was Naser, who has been working here in the Casablanca office for the grand total of 14 years.It felt natural to seek his advice on both a professional and personal level. Not everyone has the chance to have a mentor or a role model that they can look up to, but Naser has been there for me. I am very grateful for the opportunity to learn from someone more experienced, and to be able to rely on their best practices and knowledge.Being a young professional in a completely new role has its challenges, but knowing I have the support from my colleagues makes me feel very lucky to be a part of the Dell Technologies family.Career DevelopmentOne of my great colleagues, Aztout Nasreddine joined the company after graduating with a degree in Mechanical Engineering from Barking College in London. After graduating in 2005, Aztout worked as an Inside Sales Representative for the Spanish market. He later held the position of EMEA Online Help Desk for Spanish and French customers. One year later, he was promoted to the EMEA Catalogue manager and held this position for 8 years. However; this wasn’t the end of his career development, he was promoted once again and currently occupies the position as a TSR for the Nordic market.Aztout’s story wasn’t only impressive to me, it was also inspirational. Knowing that the company I work for supports the career development of their employees is extremely appealing, especially to young, passionate and ambitious millennials like myself.Relationship and Skill BuildingAztout explained that in order to be successful in this line of business, you need to maintain strong relationships with both customers and colleagues.“I’m a pro-active, self-starter, target driven individual, capable of delivering quality results that drive revenue in multifunctional and international environments. I do this by using a balance of analytical and interpersonal skills to optimize business, reduce risk & simplify procedures” said Naser.This left an impactful impression on me, as I now understand that you need to put your priorities in order and treat every request with your ‘arsenal’ of skills. In the last 5 months, I have been a part of an awesome team of Technical Sales Representatives in the Italian Market, where I’ve had the opportunity to develop my technical, communication and problem-solving skills daily.Personal LearningsThere are many things I’ve learned so far which can be used to advise future employees and young professionals:Everyone makes mistakes and you should never be afraid to make one. It’s part of the learning process and each mistake is just another lesson to learn. Be brave!Work on your organizational skills and time management – learn to prioritize and find time for work-life balance.Do more than is expected, making sure you contribute and learn as you go.Observe, learn and adapt – best practices are out there for a reason.In my conversations with colleagues, we came to the same conclusion: Dell Technologies in Casablanca, Morocco is a great place to work. It is a friendly environment and one of the fastest growing companies in the IT industry. Our office offers employees all sorts of benefits like fitness subscriptions, access to health facilities and tuition reimbursement programs. According to Aztout Nasreddine, an employee with 14 years of experience, this is what makes a company stand out.I truthfully feel I found the right place—a company with one of the greatest work environments in the market.I’m excited to see how Dell Technologies and the Moroccan Office will help me develop my career.last_img read more

27
Feb
2021

DWEN Returns to APJ: 10 Years of Celebrating Women Entrepreneurship

first_imgTen years ago the first DWEN (Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Network) Summit was hosted in Shanghai. Two main factors shaped the idea of DWEN – the fact that entrepreneurs are the force that historically leads the economy out of financial crisis, and that women business owners still struggled to access the capital, networks and resources they need to take their businesses to the next level. Fast forward to today, as delegates gathered from around the world for DWEN 2019 in Singapore, I was thrilled to see how the network and the event has evolved and grown from 50 to over 5,000. It has become such an incredible network for women entrepreneurs to foster growth and innovation.The spirit of DWEN is all about sharing stories and insights including the journeys of not-so-successful entrepreneurial ventures and their trials and tribulations. A culture where we allow space for failure, and recognize what it teaches us, ultimately delivers better results.Failure is not a bad wordThe concept of success from failure is not new, especially to the technology industry. Product and service innovation, agile processes, and R&D, is all about learning from failure and making improvements.Hearing from our many excellent speakers, I was really struck by their openness to share examples of when they got something wrong and how they learned from it – such as Sherry Boger from Intel who talked about cultural nuances that she had to adapt to when she moved to APJ.For women entrepreneurs who are scaling their businesses beyond borders, understanding these differences and learning from a network of peers along the way will help them navigate this.APJ driving innovationThinking about innovation and development, DWEN’s return to the APJ region is significant to the global adoption of emerging technologies. Women entrepreneur led organizations are leveraging these emerging technologies to facilitate business growth and enable societies and communities.We are seeing leadership in technologies like 5G, AI, blockchain, and the region holds many shining examples of digital cities and IoT deployments. It holds great potential and when women entrepreneurs can fully embrace this opportunity, it’s almost hard to imagine the full possibility.How APJ cities enable growth for women entrepreneursMinister Grace Fu, Singapore’s Culture and Youth Minister, joined the panel on Going Global: Doing Business in Asia, and offered insights into some of the complexities around the role of women in business and in society in Singapore and Asia, such as expectations around family obligations or finances.The WE Cities research assesses indicators for cities around the world that facilitate women entrepreneur’s business growth. In our 2019 research, we found:The top three cities in APJ were Melbourne, Sydney and SingaporeThe region ranks highly in the technology pillar and is the top improving region in that respect. Women in APJ have the power to use technology as an enabler and driving force behind their businesses, more than anywhere else in the worldThe region also performed well in the ‘talent’ pillar, but there are improvements to be made for ‘culture’ and ‘markets’.The WE Cities research gives us these insights to help drive conversations with governments and stakeholders, with the overall goal of facilitating women entrepreneurs who are engines of future economic growth.Our work through the DWEN platform is all about growth – building foundations, making connections and addressing challenges, to enable women entrepreneurs to grow their organizations. And the DWEN network has grown, too!As Karen Quintos mentioned in her recent post, DWEN is evolving. We are hosting regional DWEN events and are proud to have launched new DWEN chapters – most recently in India. These communities at the ground-level will continue important conversations throughout the year.I can’t wait to see what comes next as a result of these forces of innovation, growth and failure, come together.last_img read more

08
Feb
2021

‘THIS IS ME’: Rioters flaunt involvement in Capitol siege

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — In dozens of cases on social media, Trump supporters downright flaunted their activity on the day of the deadly insurrection. Some, apparently realizing they were in trouble with the law, deleted their accounts only to discover their friends and family members had already taken screenshots of their selfies, videos and comments and sent them to the FBI. It has helped authorities charge about 150 people as of Monday with federal crimes. But even with the help from the rioters themselves, investigators have still had to work rigorously to link the images to the vandalism and suspects to the acts on Jan. 6.last_img read more

08
Feb
2021

Los Angeles limits new vaccinations amid tight supplies

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California is adding mass inoculation sites even as the shortage of coronavirus vaccine has local officials restricting who gets shots. Los Angeles County said Friday it will limit new vaccinations to ensure second doses are available to those already in line for them. Meanwhile, Santa Clara County and the San Francisco 49ers said they will open California’s largest vaccination site at Levi’s Stadium early next week. Some 4.2 million shots have been administered in California. State health officials could not immediately say how many of those were second shots that would reflect the number of people in the state’s population of nearly 40 million with maximum protection from the virus.last_img read more

08
Feb
2021

Biden revokes terrorist designation for Yemen’s Houthis

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s administration is moving to revoke the designation of Yemen’s Houthis as a terrorist group, citing the need to mitigate one of the world’s worst humanitarian disasters. President Donald Trump’s administration had branded the Iranian-backed Houthis as a foreign terrorist organization, a move that limited the provision of aid to the beleaguered Yemeni people, who have suffered under a yearslong civil war and famine. A State Department official confirmed the move Friday after members of Congress were notified of the administration’s plans. The official said the removal changed nothing about the Biden administration’s views of the Houthis, who have targeted civilians and kidnapped Americans.last_img read more

26
Jan
2021

Washington chosen as top of class for 2010

first_imgNotre Dame announced Katie Washington of Gary, Ind., as the valedictorian of the graduating class of 2010 Wednesday.Having earned a 4.0 GPA in biological sciences with a minor in Catholic Social Teaching, Washington said she owes the success she’s had to the support she’s gotten from loved ones.“By no means do I feel like I’ve done this on my own,” she said. “I’m humbled and grateful to have had this experience at Notre Dame.”Washington, who received the announcement Tuesday evening, said she is still processing the news.“I’m still trying to distill my feelings and get a grasp on what it really means,” she said. “It’s very surreal.”During her time on campus, Washington was the director of the Voices of Faith Gospel Choir and active with the Center for Social Concerns, serving as the student coordinator of its “Lives in the Balance: Youth Violence and Society Seminar.”For more than two years, Washington has worked in a research lab with biology professor David Severson, with whom she co-authored a research paper. Washington said working as an undergraduate in a research lab has been one of the most significant parts of her college experience.“It has been a really transformative experience,” she said. “I was able to take charge of a project on my own but also build relationships with people in my lab.”Washington said her work in the lab with mosquitoes that transmit diseases like dengue fever and malaria has cultivated her interested in global health equity.“These diseases account for many of the deaths of people in impoverished countries,” she said.University spokesman Dennis Brown said the Valedictorian Selection Committee unanimously chose Washington from a group of 11 students.“The Valedictorian Selection Committee was greatly moved by the address that Katie Washington wrote for her fellow graduates and their families and guests,” Associate Provost Dennis Jacobs.Jacobs said Washington is an exemplar for the graduating class.“Katie’s time at Notre Dame exemplifies the principles by which she lives — excellence in all she does, compassionate service to those in need and a deeply rooted faith life that animates her,” he said. “Katie’s humble but determined spirit represents well the Class of 2010 and will serve as an inspiration for generations to come.”Upon graduation, Washington plans to pursue an M.D./Ph.D. dual degree from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md.last_img read more

26
Jan
2021

Bald, Beautiful

first_imgRoughly five months after she shaved her head for the St. Baldrick’s Day fundraiser, “The Bald and the Beautiful,” junior Elise Jordan said her morning routine is considerably shorter. “It’s growing in a lot nicer than I thought it would,” she said, running her fingers through her short hair. “I get to sleep in longer in the mornings, too, because I don’t have to mess with it.” Jordan was one of few girls to go bald last spring for the charity, which benefits childhood cancer research grants. She said she shaved her hair, which reached the middle of her back, for many reasons, but she has also learned things she could not have imagined. “There’s a lot of pressure placed on young girls and teenage girls. The last thing they should be worrying about if they have this terrible disease is looking pretty,” she said. “I hope I can just show at least one girl that you don’t need hair to be beautiful.” Jordan called her shaved head a “vanity check.” “The first six to eight weeks after I did it, I was concerned,” she said. “I kept asking, ‘Is it growing in fast enough?’” She said she met new people while on campus this summer, and they were all curious about her hair and the charity. A summer vacation at a family home in Vancouver, British Columbia, also proved interesting — many family friends asked her about her shortened hair. “People were really supportive. I’ve had a lot of positive feedback from people,” she said. “I’ve had guys say it looks better shorter.” Her hairstyle continues to make an impact; she still receives checks in the mail for donations for the charity. “People are intrigued by the entire event,” she said. “It’s a three-day event on campus, but it spans the entire year. We can still raise money.” She said she is unsure of how much money she raised personally, but she believes the event raised over $40,000 for the charity. “I don’t know how much I made,” she said. “I did online donations and have had extra money donated after. I don’t really care — it was all about how much we raised in total.” To anyone considering shaving their hair for the charity, she said it requires some thought. “Take your time,” she said. “It was very different. Some days I wanted my hair back. But it’s all about confidence. You’ve got to remember you did it for a good cause. It changed how I see myself.” She also cited her mom, a physician, as inspiration — or, more specifically, her mom’s patients. “She’s had tons of women come back in who went through chemo and were in remission with cancer again,” she said. “The first thing they say is they don’t want to do chemo again — they want to keep their hair.” While she’s uncertain if she’s going to grow her hair out or keep it short, Jordan said it’s a theoretical, and literal, weight off her shoulders. “It’s something so stupid. Why should your hair define you?” she said. “Some of my friends have long hair. I have short hair. There are a lot of things more important than a head of hair.”last_img read more

26
Jan
2021

Archaeology class travels to Ireland

first_imgExplore Celtic Iron Age ruins? Check. Examine six-thousand-year-old Neolithic agricultural land? Check. Survive a gale that suspended the ferry system? Check. Rain or shine, 12 Notre Dame students in the Archaeology of Ireland class ventured out each day during Fall Break to study the interdisciplinary facets of archaeology in coastal Ireland. Professor Ian Kuijt, who has taught the course for the past five years, said the trip offered students an experience of the country far more intensive than that available to casual visitors. “[There is] an adaptive, spontaneous aspect to it. You see sites off the beaten track, not ones you’d take a tourist bus to,” Kuijt said. “Most are in remote locations and [students] probably won’t ever see them again.” Kuijt planned this year’s trip in collaboration with Director of Irish Studies Chris Fox and received funding from Richard Sweetman, ’58. Kuijt, accompanied by John O’Neill, a professor at Ireland’s Carlow College, led students in exploring five to eight sites each day. Each student took charge of a site, preparing a tour with write-ups and maps. “When we went to the site, [the student site leader] had to wear a very attractive red safety vest and give a tour for 30 to 40 minutes. They were essentially in charge of that educational moment,” Kuijt said. “That person always got to go on the site first, because it was theirs.” Some of the sites included areas where Kuijt had done archeological surveys in the past, including Omey Island and Inisbofin. Kuijt and his students were prevented from visiting one of their planned sites by an intense gale that shut down the necessary ferry. Kuijt said the students dealt well with the severe weather conditions. “We went out in full rain gear but were getting sunburned on our faces and hands. It’s the roughest I’ve seen it in five years,” he said. “But they took great advantage of it in good spirits, which isn’t something all people can do.” Junior Ryan Lion said the opportunity to employ the skills and knowledge he learned in class made the trip worth the difficult weather and sparse sleep. “Archeology lets you contextualize a period. You can read about it and have it ingrained in you, but when you actually stand in the remains of a building from the sixth century, it really impacts you,” he said. “It was really active, involved learning.” Lion said he was drawn to the Portumna Workhouse site because of his interest in health. “It provided information on the health of Irish workhouses and the diseases affecting the people living in them at that time. People suffered from cholera and typhoid,” he said. “The infirmary was understaffed and even those few workers lacked a medical background.” Lion and his classmates wrote papers and constructed posters on the sites they visited. He said the students’ firsthand experiences of the sites will enrich their projects more than traditional research. “We’ll do a lot of secondary research for the papers and posters, including statistics and any reading relevant to the topic,” he said, “but primary observation is important for insight ­— we’re not just spitting out academic blurbs.” Once the posters are completed, Kuijt said they will be exhibited at Flanner Hall, where they will be judged by an Irish researcher. Beyond the expanded knowledge about Irish culture and archeology, Kuijt said the students will benefit from the development of communication and presentation skills required by the projects associated with the trip. “They get this local experience, a hidden Ireland with some zany instructors, but they get a whole range of transportable skills as well,” he said. “That’s what’s paying off.” Lion said the trip offered an understanding of the course’s subject beyond what he could learn from lectures or textbooks. “We got to think like archeologists rather than just reading about it,” he said. “I just loved having the chance to learn about the unique identity of Irish culture and how diverse it is within its own national boundary.”last_img read more

26
Jan
2021

Notre Dame, SMC celebrate International Education Week

first_imgInternational and domestic students can celebrate their cultures together during International Education Week (IEW), sponsored by the International Student Services and Activities (ISSA) this week. McKenna Pensak, assistant director of communications and outreach for ISSA, said the nation-wide initiative brings different communities and cultures together. “International Education Week is a national event that is coordinated by the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Education to celebrate and promote global exchange between the U.S. and other countries,” Pensak said. ISSA sponsors the week of cultural events annually, Pensak said. “I think this is a great week for all students, faculty and staff to learn about other countries and cultures,” Pensak said. “It’s also a really great way to celebrate the international student community at Notre Dame.” Students learned about formal meal etiquette around the world at the Career Center’s International Student Etiquette Dinner on Monday night to kick off the week. “We [talked] about formal etiquette specifically related to interviews or when you’re on the job, and how you should act in a formal meal situation,” she said. Pensak said she expects the most popular event to be the second annual International Taste of South Bend held Wednesday in the LaFortune Ballroom. “We have eight international restaurants from the community that are providing international cuisine samples,” Pensak said. “It’s totally free and a lot of fun.” Approximately 200 students attended the inaugural event last year, Pensak said. Students from the International Ambassador program, a team of both international and American student leaders, helped organize the dining event. Pensak said the ISSA also sponsors a sale of goods and handicrafts from the fair trade retailer Ten Thousand Villages every year during IEW. “Ten Thousand Villages is a fair trade organization which provides vital, fair income to Third World people by marketing their handiwork and telling their stories in North America,” Pensak said. The products will be sold throughout the week in the atrium of Hesburgh Library. Although she is looking forward to attending the Ten Thousand Villages handicraft fair, Lynn McGreevy, a sophomore from Ireland, said the lack of European-themed events is disappointing. “It’s mostly catered to the Latino community and there’s something for Brazilians too, but there isn’t really anything for Europeans,” McGreevy said. “I think it’d be nice if there was, but I also think there’s not enough of us [Europeans] on campus for it to matter too much.” McGreevy said she hopes this week will help domestic students realize that foreign cultures vary greatly from the Notre Dame culture. “Notre Dame has such a strong culture — like everyone knows Notre Dame and its football and the huge religious side,” she said. “But when I came here I didn’t know anything about American football. I didn’t understand tailgating or any of that stuff.” Karina Rattaccioli, a freshman from Nicaragua, agreed that IEW should encourage American students to learn more about the places international students call home. “It should make everyone else aware of who international students are and what their cultures are,” Rattaccioli said. “It’s interesting finding out about all that and seeing the different backgrounds people are coming from.” Last year, Pensak said IEW also began to collect donations for the Refugee Resettlement Program at the St. Joseph Chapter of the American Red Cross. The program needs children’s toys, school supplies and unopened toiletries, Pensak said. “The St. Joe’s chapter became an authorized refugee resettlement agency in 2010,” she said. “They help settle refugees in the South Bend area. We will be collecting donations for them in 105 Main Building and at the International Taste of South Bend.” For a complete list of the times and locations of the IEW events, visit issa.nd.edulast_img read more